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girlsonwheelsmag:

DIMITRI COSTE bikegirls photography by Grace García

1. Tell us about your work it in a few lines
I am a French photographer & filmmaker based in Paris. i work for th music and fashion industry, but i am also active and involved in some other scenes like Motorcycle, BMX and skateboard for the simple reason that i do ride, and i am since very young, truly passionate about those lifestyle, cultures and sports.
2. Why bikes?
Because that’s my first love. i grew up on two wheels with pedals dreaming about two wheels with an engine. my first love is motocross, and this is the reason why i started riding BMX when i was 6 years old. i was mostly doing freestyle BMX in the streets with my brother. bikes with or without engine offers you a unique feeling of freedom and power, its all about feelings.
3. Where are you based and why?
I am based in Paris France, because this is where i’m from. I still ask myself sometimes why i do not live in California. The reason is that by still living in Paris, and be lucky enough to travel a lot, i keep enjoying mostly the good parts of California, i’m still exciting and amazed everytime i go there, and i travel to the US 4 to 7 times a year. Traveling made me appreciate and love more France and Paris, because i could compare.
4. You are a rider boy?
Yes i am. I am more focused on the riding aspect rather than the parts aspect. people love to collect, build and tune their bikes, i prefer riding. As people at Sideburn mag say « its not what you ride, its how you ride it”
5. Any future projects?

Many, i am getting ready to race my 1967 Triumph in Japan for The Hell On Wheels Vintage MX race may 3rd. I am also competing in the UK FlatTrack championship with my 1973 rigid 600cc BSA this year in the Vintage Class.

This is for riding. For photography, i just finished to shoot and direct the new campaign for watch brand www.march-lab.com, new images and films should be launched soon, i am working on a exhibition and book about hot chicks & oldschool BMX. and on the side i am working on launching a label that will offer interior decoration products…. and even a made in France skateboard. Stay tuned…


http://dimitri-coste.com
http://instagram.com/motelcoste
facebook.com/dimitricostephoto
girlsonwheelsmag:

DIMITRI COSTE bikegirls photography by Grace García

1. Tell us about your work it in a few lines
I am a French photographer & filmmaker based in Paris. i work for th music and fashion industry, but i am also active and involved in some other scenes like Motorcycle, BMX and skateboard for the simple reason that i do ride, and i am since very young, truly passionate about those lifestyle, cultures and sports.
2. Why bikes?
Because that’s my first love. i grew up on two wheels with pedals dreaming about two wheels with an engine. my first love is motocross, and this is the reason why i started riding BMX when i was 6 years old. i was mostly doing freestyle BMX in the streets with my brother. bikes with or without engine offers you a unique feeling of freedom and power, its all about feelings.
3. Where are you based and why?
I am based in Paris France, because this is where i’m from. I still ask myself sometimes why i do not live in California. The reason is that by still living in Paris, and be lucky enough to travel a lot, i keep enjoying mostly the good parts of California, i’m still exciting and amazed everytime i go there, and i travel to the US 4 to 7 times a year. Traveling made me appreciate and love more France and Paris, because i could compare.
4. You are a rider boy?
Yes i am. I am more focused on the riding aspect rather than the parts aspect. people love to collect, build and tune their bikes, i prefer riding. As people at Sideburn mag say « its not what you ride, its how you ride it”
5. Any future projects?

Many, i am getting ready to race my 1967 Triumph in Japan for The Hell On Wheels Vintage MX race may 3rd. I am also competing in the UK FlatTrack championship with my 1973 rigid 600cc BSA this year in the Vintage Class.

This is for riding. For photography, i just finished to shoot and direct the new campaign for watch brand www.march-lab.com, new images and films should be launched soon, i am working on a exhibition and book about hot chicks & oldschool BMX. and on the side i am working on launching a label that will offer interior decoration products…. and even a made in France skateboard. Stay tuned…


http://dimitri-coste.com
http://instagram.com/motelcoste
facebook.com/dimitricostephoto
girlsonwheelsmag:

DIMITRI COSTE bikegirls photography by Grace García

1. Tell us about your work it in a few lines
I am a French photographer & filmmaker based in Paris. i work for th music and fashion industry, but i am also active and involved in some other scenes like Motorcycle, BMX and skateboard for the simple reason that i do ride, and i am since very young, truly passionate about those lifestyle, cultures and sports.
2. Why bikes?
Because that’s my first love. i grew up on two wheels with pedals dreaming about two wheels with an engine. my first love is motocross, and this is the reason why i started riding BMX when i was 6 years old. i was mostly doing freestyle BMX in the streets with my brother. bikes with or without engine offers you a unique feeling of freedom and power, its all about feelings.
3. Where are you based and why?
I am based in Paris France, because this is where i’m from. I still ask myself sometimes why i do not live in California. The reason is that by still living in Paris, and be lucky enough to travel a lot, i keep enjoying mostly the good parts of California, i’m still exciting and amazed everytime i go there, and i travel to the US 4 to 7 times a year. Traveling made me appreciate and love more France and Paris, because i could compare.
4. You are a rider boy?
Yes i am. I am more focused on the riding aspect rather than the parts aspect. people love to collect, build and tune their bikes, i prefer riding. As people at Sideburn mag say « its not what you ride, its how you ride it”
5. Any future projects?

Many, i am getting ready to race my 1967 Triumph in Japan for The Hell On Wheels Vintage MX race may 3rd. I am also competing in the UK FlatTrack championship with my 1973 rigid 600cc BSA this year in the Vintage Class.

This is for riding. For photography, i just finished to shoot and direct the new campaign for watch brand www.march-lab.com, new images and films should be launched soon, i am working on a exhibition and book about hot chicks & oldschool BMX. and on the side i am working on launching a label that will offer interior decoration products…. and even a made in France skateboard. Stay tuned…


http://dimitri-coste.com
http://instagram.com/motelcoste
facebook.com/dimitricostephoto
girlsonwheelsmag:

DIMITRI COSTE bikegirls photography by Grace García

1. Tell us about your work it in a few lines
I am a French photographer & filmmaker based in Paris. i work for th music and fashion industry, but i am also active and involved in some other scenes like Motorcycle, BMX and skateboard for the simple reason that i do ride, and i am since very young, truly passionate about those lifestyle, cultures and sports.
2. Why bikes?
Because that’s my first love. i grew up on two wheels with pedals dreaming about two wheels with an engine. my first love is motocross, and this is the reason why i started riding BMX when i was 6 years old. i was mostly doing freestyle BMX in the streets with my brother. bikes with or without engine offers you a unique feeling of freedom and power, its all about feelings.
3. Where are you based and why?
I am based in Paris France, because this is where i’m from. I still ask myself sometimes why i do not live in California. The reason is that by still living in Paris, and be lucky enough to travel a lot, i keep enjoying mostly the good parts of California, i’m still exciting and amazed everytime i go there, and i travel to the US 4 to 7 times a year. Traveling made me appreciate and love more France and Paris, because i could compare.
4. You are a rider boy?
Yes i am. I am more focused on the riding aspect rather than the parts aspect. people love to collect, build and tune their bikes, i prefer riding. As people at Sideburn mag say « its not what you ride, its how you ride it”
5. Any future projects?

Many, i am getting ready to race my 1967 Triumph in Japan for The Hell On Wheels Vintage MX race may 3rd. I am also competing in the UK FlatTrack championship with my 1973 rigid 600cc BSA this year in the Vintage Class.

This is for riding. For photography, i just finished to shoot and direct the new campaign for watch brand www.march-lab.com, new images and films should be launched soon, i am working on a exhibition and book about hot chicks & oldschool BMX. and on the side i am working on launching a label that will offer interior decoration products…. and even a made in France skateboard. Stay tuned…


http://dimitri-coste.com
http://instagram.com/motelcoste
facebook.com/dimitricostephoto
girlsonwheelsmag:

DIMITRI COSTE bikegirls photography by Grace García

1. Tell us about your work it in a few lines
I am a French photographer & filmmaker based in Paris. i work for th music and fashion industry, but i am also active and involved in some other scenes like Motorcycle, BMX and skateboard for the simple reason that i do ride, and i am since very young, truly passionate about those lifestyle, cultures and sports.
2. Why bikes?
Because that’s my first love. i grew up on two wheels with pedals dreaming about two wheels with an engine. my first love is motocross, and this is the reason why i started riding BMX when i was 6 years old. i was mostly doing freestyle BMX in the streets with my brother. bikes with or without engine offers you a unique feeling of freedom and power, its all about feelings.
3. Where are you based and why?
I am based in Paris France, because this is where i’m from. I still ask myself sometimes why i do not live in California. The reason is that by still living in Paris, and be lucky enough to travel a lot, i keep enjoying mostly the good parts of California, i’m still exciting and amazed everytime i go there, and i travel to the US 4 to 7 times a year. Traveling made me appreciate and love more France and Paris, because i could compare.
4. You are a rider boy?
Yes i am. I am more focused on the riding aspect rather than the parts aspect. people love to collect, build and tune their bikes, i prefer riding. As people at Sideburn mag say « its not what you ride, its how you ride it”
5. Any future projects?

Many, i am getting ready to race my 1967 Triumph in Japan for The Hell On Wheels Vintage MX race may 3rd. I am also competing in the UK FlatTrack championship with my 1973 rigid 600cc BSA this year in the Vintage Class.

This is for riding. For photography, i just finished to shoot and direct the new campaign for watch brand www.march-lab.com, new images and films should be launched soon, i am working on a exhibition and book about hot chicks & oldschool BMX. and on the side i am working on launching a label that will offer interior decoration products…. and even a made in France skateboard. Stay tuned…


http://dimitri-coste.com
http://instagram.com/motelcoste
facebook.com/dimitricostephoto
girlsonwheelsmag:

DIMITRI COSTE bikegirls photography by Grace García

1. Tell us about your work it in a few lines
I am a French photographer & filmmaker based in Paris. i work for th music and fashion industry, but i am also active and involved in some other scenes like Motorcycle, BMX and skateboard for the simple reason that i do ride, and i am since very young, truly passionate about those lifestyle, cultures and sports.
2. Why bikes?
Because that’s my first love. i grew up on two wheels with pedals dreaming about two wheels with an engine. my first love is motocross, and this is the reason why i started riding BMX when i was 6 years old. i was mostly doing freestyle BMX in the streets with my brother. bikes with or without engine offers you a unique feeling of freedom and power, its all about feelings.
3. Where are you based and why?
I am based in Paris France, because this is where i’m from. I still ask myself sometimes why i do not live in California. The reason is that by still living in Paris, and be lucky enough to travel a lot, i keep enjoying mostly the good parts of California, i’m still exciting and amazed everytime i go there, and i travel to the US 4 to 7 times a year. Traveling made me appreciate and love more France and Paris, because i could compare.
4. You are a rider boy?
Yes i am. I am more focused on the riding aspect rather than the parts aspect. people love to collect, build and tune their bikes, i prefer riding. As people at Sideburn mag say « its not what you ride, its how you ride it”
5. Any future projects?

Many, i am getting ready to race my 1967 Triumph in Japan for The Hell On Wheels Vintage MX race may 3rd. I am also competing in the UK FlatTrack championship with my 1973 rigid 600cc BSA this year in the Vintage Class.

This is for riding. For photography, i just finished to shoot and direct the new campaign for watch brand www.march-lab.com, new images and films should be launched soon, i am working on a exhibition and book about hot chicks & oldschool BMX. and on the side i am working on launching a label that will offer interior decoration products…. and even a made in France skateboard. Stay tuned…


http://dimitri-coste.com
http://instagram.com/motelcoste
facebook.com/dimitricostephoto
girlsonwheelsmag:

DIMITRI COSTE bikegirls photography by Grace García

1. Tell us about your work it in a few lines
I am a French photographer & filmmaker based in Paris. i work for th music and fashion industry, but i am also active and involved in some other scenes like Motorcycle, BMX and skateboard for the simple reason that i do ride, and i am since very young, truly passionate about those lifestyle, cultures and sports.
2. Why bikes?
Because that’s my first love. i grew up on two wheels with pedals dreaming about two wheels with an engine. my first love is motocross, and this is the reason why i started riding BMX when i was 6 years old. i was mostly doing freestyle BMX in the streets with my brother. bikes with or without engine offers you a unique feeling of freedom and power, its all about feelings.
3. Where are you based and why?
I am based in Paris France, because this is where i’m from. I still ask myself sometimes why i do not live in California. The reason is that by still living in Paris, and be lucky enough to travel a lot, i keep enjoying mostly the good parts of California, i’m still exciting and amazed everytime i go there, and i travel to the US 4 to 7 times a year. Traveling made me appreciate and love more France and Paris, because i could compare.
4. You are a rider boy?
Yes i am. I am more focused on the riding aspect rather than the parts aspect. people love to collect, build and tune their bikes, i prefer riding. As people at Sideburn mag say « its not what you ride, its how you ride it”
5. Any future projects?

Many, i am getting ready to race my 1967 Triumph in Japan for The Hell On Wheels Vintage MX race may 3rd. I am also competing in the UK FlatTrack championship with my 1973 rigid 600cc BSA this year in the Vintage Class.

This is for riding. For photography, i just finished to shoot and direct the new campaign for watch brand www.march-lab.com, new images and films should be launched soon, i am working on a exhibition and book about hot chicks & oldschool BMX. and on the side i am working on launching a label that will offer interior decoration products…. and even a made in France skateboard. Stay tuned…


http://dimitri-coste.com
http://instagram.com/motelcoste
facebook.com/dimitricostephoto
+
girlsonwheelsmag:

VELORAPIDA by Ana V. Francés
1. Tell us about the project it in a few lines 2. Where did the idea of “VELORAPIDA” come from? 3. why “electric bikes”?
Hectic groove, difficult urban mobility and environmental awareness are more and more pushing us to use bicycles rather than cars. And electric bikes are living their momentum as the ideal solution to move in town easily and healthy, for us and for the environment. But it is not easy to find a nice bike, without too many cables and the battery compromising the look.
From this intuition two friends, lifestyle lovers and ecology oriented, were looking for alternative solutions to bicycles with pedal assist. Together with a manufacturer with a 90 years tradition in bikes manufacturing they conceived Velorapida, starting from the original look with classic design and the wish to respect its elegance. The first Velorapida models were launched in Summer 2013, vintage e-bikes with the right mix between style and technology, elegance and innovation. Velorapida is meant for design lovers, who want an e-bike but also elegance and vintage flair, as well as careful design and innovative technology.
In each Velorapida the battery is hidden in the front leather bag. Thanks to the 250-watt motor allowing 5 different levels of speed, the bikes reach a speed of 25 km per hour for over 60 km. All models are equipped with a LCD display to monitor and adjust the speed and to check the mileage, with automatic two-speeds SRAM transmission and with a wireless system stopping the motor when brakes are activated. The wheels have hand mounted reinforced stainless steel spokes.  
Velorapida e-bikes can be purchased on line on www.velorapida.com, with the possibility to see pictures, choose model and accessories, ask for customization or different requests.
4. Who do you take your inspiration from?
Vintage bikes have an endless flair and we wanted to maintain the design though realizing modern electric bicycles. Each Velorapida is made in Italy with focus on quality and passion for details, following the world renowned tradition of Italian manufacturers integrated with innovation, safety and reliability.   
5. Where are you based and why?
Velorapida is based in Milano. Not only the bikes, but also all accessories and leather parts are made by Italian artisans.
6. Any future project?
Product development is the core of our business, we are continuously looking for new trends and technologies in our sector, where innovation combined with design and tradition have proven to be Velorapida’s success factor.

www.velorapida.com
girlsonwheelsmag:

VELORAPIDA by Ana V. Francés
1. Tell us about the project it in a few lines 2. Where did the idea of “VELORAPIDA” come from? 3. why “electric bikes”?
Hectic groove, difficult urban mobility and environmental awareness are more and more pushing us to use bicycles rather than cars. And electric bikes are living their momentum as the ideal solution to move in town easily and healthy, for us and for the environment. But it is not easy to find a nice bike, without too many cables and the battery compromising the look.
From this intuition two friends, lifestyle lovers and ecology oriented, were looking for alternative solutions to bicycles with pedal assist. Together with a manufacturer with a 90 years tradition in bikes manufacturing they conceived Velorapida, starting from the original look with classic design and the wish to respect its elegance. The first Velorapida models were launched in Summer 2013, vintage e-bikes with the right mix between style and technology, elegance and innovation. Velorapida is meant for design lovers, who want an e-bike but also elegance and vintage flair, as well as careful design and innovative technology.
In each Velorapida the battery is hidden in the front leather bag. Thanks to the 250-watt motor allowing 5 different levels of speed, the bikes reach a speed of 25 km per hour for over 60 km. All models are equipped with a LCD display to monitor and adjust the speed and to check the mileage, with automatic two-speeds SRAM transmission and with a wireless system stopping the motor when brakes are activated. The wheels have hand mounted reinforced stainless steel spokes.  
Velorapida e-bikes can be purchased on line on www.velorapida.com, with the possibility to see pictures, choose model and accessories, ask for customization or different requests.
4. Who do you take your inspiration from?
Vintage bikes have an endless flair and we wanted to maintain the design though realizing modern electric bicycles. Each Velorapida is made in Italy with focus on quality and passion for details, following the world renowned tradition of Italian manufacturers integrated with innovation, safety and reliability.   
5. Where are you based and why?
Velorapida is based in Milano. Not only the bikes, but also all accessories and leather parts are made by Italian artisans.
6. Any future project?
Product development is the core of our business, we are continuously looking for new trends and technologies in our sector, where innovation combined with design and tradition have proven to be Velorapida’s success factor.

www.velorapida.com
girlsonwheelsmag:

VELORAPIDA by Ana V. Francés
1. Tell us about the project it in a few lines 2. Where did the idea of “VELORAPIDA” come from? 3. why “electric bikes”?
Hectic groove, difficult urban mobility and environmental awareness are more and more pushing us to use bicycles rather than cars. And electric bikes are living their momentum as the ideal solution to move in town easily and healthy, for us and for the environment. But it is not easy to find a nice bike, without too many cables and the battery compromising the look.
From this intuition two friends, lifestyle lovers and ecology oriented, were looking for alternative solutions to bicycles with pedal assist. Together with a manufacturer with a 90 years tradition in bikes manufacturing they conceived Velorapida, starting from the original look with classic design and the wish to respect its elegance. The first Velorapida models were launched in Summer 2013, vintage e-bikes with the right mix between style and technology, elegance and innovation. Velorapida is meant for design lovers, who want an e-bike but also elegance and vintage flair, as well as careful design and innovative technology.
In each Velorapida the battery is hidden in the front leather bag. Thanks to the 250-watt motor allowing 5 different levels of speed, the bikes reach a speed of 25 km per hour for over 60 km. All models are equipped with a LCD display to monitor and adjust the speed and to check the mileage, with automatic two-speeds SRAM transmission and with a wireless system stopping the motor when brakes are activated. The wheels have hand mounted reinforced stainless steel spokes.  
Velorapida e-bikes can be purchased on line on www.velorapida.com, with the possibility to see pictures, choose model and accessories, ask for customization or different requests.
4. Who do you take your inspiration from?
Vintage bikes have an endless flair and we wanted to maintain the design though realizing modern electric bicycles. Each Velorapida is made in Italy with focus on quality and passion for details, following the world renowned tradition of Italian manufacturers integrated with innovation, safety and reliability.   
5. Where are you based and why?
Velorapida is based in Milano. Not only the bikes, but also all accessories and leather parts are made by Italian artisans.
6. Any future project?
Product development is the core of our business, we are continuously looking for new trends and technologies in our sector, where innovation combined with design and tradition have proven to be Velorapida’s success factor.

www.velorapida.com
girlsonwheelsmag:

VELORAPIDA by Ana V. Francés
1. Tell us about the project it in a few lines 2. Where did the idea of “VELORAPIDA” come from? 3. why “electric bikes”?
Hectic groove, difficult urban mobility and environmental awareness are more and more pushing us to use bicycles rather than cars. And electric bikes are living their momentum as the ideal solution to move in town easily and healthy, for us and for the environment. But it is not easy to find a nice bike, without too many cables and the battery compromising the look.
From this intuition two friends, lifestyle lovers and ecology oriented, were looking for alternative solutions to bicycles with pedal assist. Together with a manufacturer with a 90 years tradition in bikes manufacturing they conceived Velorapida, starting from the original look with classic design and the wish to respect its elegance. The first Velorapida models were launched in Summer 2013, vintage e-bikes with the right mix between style and technology, elegance and innovation. Velorapida is meant for design lovers, who want an e-bike but also elegance and vintage flair, as well as careful design and innovative technology.
In each Velorapida the battery is hidden in the front leather bag. Thanks to the 250-watt motor allowing 5 different levels of speed, the bikes reach a speed of 25 km per hour for over 60 km. All models are equipped with a LCD display to monitor and adjust the speed and to check the mileage, with automatic two-speeds SRAM transmission and with a wireless system stopping the motor when brakes are activated. The wheels have hand mounted reinforced stainless steel spokes.  
Velorapida e-bikes can be purchased on line on www.velorapida.com, with the possibility to see pictures, choose model and accessories, ask for customization or different requests.
4. Who do you take your inspiration from?
Vintage bikes have an endless flair and we wanted to maintain the design though realizing modern electric bicycles. Each Velorapida is made in Italy with focus on quality and passion for details, following the world renowned tradition of Italian manufacturers integrated with innovation, safety and reliability.   
5. Where are you based and why?
Velorapida is based in Milano. Not only the bikes, but also all accessories and leather parts are made by Italian artisans.
6. Any future project?
Product development is the core of our business, we are continuously looking for new trends and technologies in our sector, where innovation combined with design and tradition have proven to be Velorapida’s success factor.

www.velorapida.com
girlsonwheelsmag:

VELORAPIDA by Ana V. Francés
1. Tell us about the project it in a few lines 2. Where did the idea of “VELORAPIDA” come from? 3. why “electric bikes”?
Hectic groove, difficult urban mobility and environmental awareness are more and more pushing us to use bicycles rather than cars. And electric bikes are living their momentum as the ideal solution to move in town easily and healthy, for us and for the environment. But it is not easy to find a nice bike, without too many cables and the battery compromising the look.
From this intuition two friends, lifestyle lovers and ecology oriented, were looking for alternative solutions to bicycles with pedal assist. Together with a manufacturer with a 90 years tradition in bikes manufacturing they conceived Velorapida, starting from the original look with classic design and the wish to respect its elegance. The first Velorapida models were launched in Summer 2013, vintage e-bikes with the right mix between style and technology, elegance and innovation. Velorapida is meant for design lovers, who want an e-bike but also elegance and vintage flair, as well as careful design and innovative technology.
In each Velorapida the battery is hidden in the front leather bag. Thanks to the 250-watt motor allowing 5 different levels of speed, the bikes reach a speed of 25 km per hour for over 60 km. All models are equipped with a LCD display to monitor and adjust the speed and to check the mileage, with automatic two-speeds SRAM transmission and with a wireless system stopping the motor when brakes are activated. The wheels have hand mounted reinforced stainless steel spokes.  
Velorapida e-bikes can be purchased on line on www.velorapida.com, with the possibility to see pictures, choose model and accessories, ask for customization or different requests.
4. Who do you take your inspiration from?
Vintage bikes have an endless flair and we wanted to maintain the design though realizing modern electric bicycles. Each Velorapida is made in Italy with focus on quality and passion for details, following the world renowned tradition of Italian manufacturers integrated with innovation, safety and reliability.   
5. Where are you based and why?
Velorapida is based in Milano. Not only the bikes, but also all accessories and leather parts are made by Italian artisans.
6. Any future project?
Product development is the core of our business, we are continuously looking for new trends and technologies in our sector, where innovation combined with design and tradition have proven to be Velorapida’s success factor.

www.velorapida.com
+
girlsonwheelsmag:

 Bikes - Louise Isbjørn By Ana V. Francés
1. Tell us about the project it in a few lines
I started to collect as many pictures of bikes around  the city, that stand me out  immediately, to have a big data base of pictures.
From this I chose afterwards which one I want to draw, to have a wide palette of colors, forms and details. Thats why there’s no background at the pictures, the bike should stay for itself, to put forward the details.
Of course it’s a never ending project, as there are to many bikes in the streets, to even think of being finished some day.
When I have collected enough bikes from different cities, i may make a comparison. But i’m not sure yet if you’ll see a difference in the different bikes of each city. But it’s worth a try, even if will be just something for the eye. A wall full of Bikes can’t be something not-good-looking.
2. Why bikes?
Bikes have some real personal aspects. People add some special details, to customize their bikes and make them unique.  It’s easier to take pictures of them than other personal things. And the good thing is, that all the bikes look different, so it never gets boring.
As i could’t even decide, what kind of a bike i would like to have, i collect other peoples bikes and draw them. This makes me feel a bit, like their bikes are also mine a little bit and i don’t have to decide, how my bike would have to look like.
4. Who do you take your inspiration from?
There’s so many inspiration  if you just walk around with open eyes you can do a lot things  with the stuff you find next to you.
5. Where are you based and why?
Right now i’m based in Berlin, to get new inspiration and concentrate just on drawing.
6.  What kind of bike do you ride?
At the moment i don’t have a bike. But at home i got a Gazelle ladies Bike and my fathers old Tigra Racing bike.
http://www.louiseisbjoern.ch/
girlsonwheelsmag:

 Bikes - Louise Isbjørn By Ana V. Francés
1. Tell us about the project it in a few lines
I started to collect as many pictures of bikes around  the city, that stand me out  immediately, to have a big data base of pictures.
From this I chose afterwards which one I want to draw, to have a wide palette of colors, forms and details. Thats why there’s no background at the pictures, the bike should stay for itself, to put forward the details.
Of course it’s a never ending project, as there are to many bikes in the streets, to even think of being finished some day.
When I have collected enough bikes from different cities, i may make a comparison. But i’m not sure yet if you’ll see a difference in the different bikes of each city. But it’s worth a try, even if will be just something for the eye. A wall full of Bikes can’t be something not-good-looking.
2. Why bikes?
Bikes have some real personal aspects. People add some special details, to customize their bikes and make them unique.  It’s easier to take pictures of them than other personal things. And the good thing is, that all the bikes look different, so it never gets boring.
As i could’t even decide, what kind of a bike i would like to have, i collect other peoples bikes and draw them. This makes me feel a bit, like their bikes are also mine a little bit and i don’t have to decide, how my bike would have to look like.
4. Who do you take your inspiration from?
There’s so many inspiration  if you just walk around with open eyes you can do a lot things  with the stuff you find next to you.
5. Where are you based and why?
Right now i’m based in Berlin, to get new inspiration and concentrate just on drawing.
6.  What kind of bike do you ride?
At the moment i don’t have a bike. But at home i got a Gazelle ladies Bike and my fathers old Tigra Racing bike.
http://www.louiseisbjoern.ch/
girlsonwheelsmag:

 Bikes - Louise Isbjørn By Ana V. Francés
1. Tell us about the project it in a few lines
I started to collect as many pictures of bikes around  the city, that stand me out  immediately, to have a big data base of pictures.
From this I chose afterwards which one I want to draw, to have a wide palette of colors, forms and details. Thats why there’s no background at the pictures, the bike should stay for itself, to put forward the details.
Of course it’s a never ending project, as there are to many bikes in the streets, to even think of being finished some day.
When I have collected enough bikes from different cities, i may make a comparison. But i’m not sure yet if you’ll see a difference in the different bikes of each city. But it’s worth a try, even if will be just something for the eye. A wall full of Bikes can’t be something not-good-looking.
2. Why bikes?
Bikes have some real personal aspects. People add some special details, to customize their bikes and make them unique.  It’s easier to take pictures of them than other personal things. And the good thing is, that all the bikes look different, so it never gets boring.
As i could’t even decide, what kind of a bike i would like to have, i collect other peoples bikes and draw them. This makes me feel a bit, like their bikes are also mine a little bit and i don’t have to decide, how my bike would have to look like.
4. Who do you take your inspiration from?
There’s so many inspiration  if you just walk around with open eyes you can do a lot things  with the stuff you find next to you.
5. Where are you based and why?
Right now i’m based in Berlin, to get new inspiration and concentrate just on drawing.
6.  What kind of bike do you ride?
At the moment i don’t have a bike. But at home i got a Gazelle ladies Bike and my fathers old Tigra Racing bike.
http://www.louiseisbjoern.ch/
girlsonwheelsmag:

 Bikes - Louise Isbjørn By Ana V. Francés
1. Tell us about the project it in a few lines
I started to collect as many pictures of bikes around  the city, that stand me out  immediately, to have a big data base of pictures.
From this I chose afterwards which one I want to draw, to have a wide palette of colors, forms and details. Thats why there’s no background at the pictures, the bike should stay for itself, to put forward the details.
Of course it’s a never ending project, as there are to many bikes in the streets, to even think of being finished some day.
When I have collected enough bikes from different cities, i may make a comparison. But i’m not sure yet if you’ll see a difference in the different bikes of each city. But it’s worth a try, even if will be just something for the eye. A wall full of Bikes can’t be something not-good-looking.
2. Why bikes?
Bikes have some real personal aspects. People add some special details, to customize their bikes and make them unique.  It’s easier to take pictures of them than other personal things. And the good thing is, that all the bikes look different, so it never gets boring.
As i could’t even decide, what kind of a bike i would like to have, i collect other peoples bikes and draw them. This makes me feel a bit, like their bikes are also mine a little bit and i don’t have to decide, how my bike would have to look like.
4. Who do you take your inspiration from?
There’s so many inspiration  if you just walk around with open eyes you can do a lot things  with the stuff you find next to you.
5. Where are you based and why?
Right now i’m based in Berlin, to get new inspiration and concentrate just on drawing.
6.  What kind of bike do you ride?
At the moment i don’t have a bike. But at home i got a Gazelle ladies Bike and my fathers old Tigra Racing bike.
http://www.louiseisbjoern.ch/
girlsonwheelsmag:

 Bikes - Louise Isbjørn By Ana V. Francés
1. Tell us about the project it in a few lines
I started to collect as many pictures of bikes around  the city, that stand me out  immediately, to have a big data base of pictures.
From this I chose afterwards which one I want to draw, to have a wide palette of colors, forms and details. Thats why there’s no background at the pictures, the bike should stay for itself, to put forward the details.
Of course it’s a never ending project, as there are to many bikes in the streets, to even think of being finished some day.
When I have collected enough bikes from different cities, i may make a comparison. But i’m not sure yet if you’ll see a difference in the different bikes of each city. But it’s worth a try, even if will be just something for the eye. A wall full of Bikes can’t be something not-good-looking.
2. Why bikes?
Bikes have some real personal aspects. People add some special details, to customize their bikes and make them unique.  It’s easier to take pictures of them than other personal things. And the good thing is, that all the bikes look different, so it never gets boring.
As i could’t even decide, what kind of a bike i would like to have, i collect other peoples bikes and draw them. This makes me feel a bit, like their bikes are also mine a little bit and i don’t have to decide, how my bike would have to look like.
4. Who do you take your inspiration from?
There’s so many inspiration  if you just walk around with open eyes you can do a lot things  with the stuff you find next to you.
5. Where are you based and why?
Right now i’m based in Berlin, to get new inspiration and concentrate just on drawing.
6.  What kind of bike do you ride?
At the moment i don’t have a bike. But at home i got a Gazelle ladies Bike and my fathers old Tigra Racing bike.
http://www.louiseisbjoern.ch/
girlsonwheelsmag:

 Bikes - Louise Isbjørn By Ana V. Francés
1. Tell us about the project it in a few lines
I started to collect as many pictures of bikes around  the city, that stand me out  immediately, to have a big data base of pictures.
From this I chose afterwards which one I want to draw, to have a wide palette of colors, forms and details. Thats why there’s no background at the pictures, the bike should stay for itself, to put forward the details.
Of course it’s a never ending project, as there are to many bikes in the streets, to even think of being finished some day.
When I have collected enough bikes from different cities, i may make a comparison. But i’m not sure yet if you’ll see a difference in the different bikes of each city. But it’s worth a try, even if will be just something for the eye. A wall full of Bikes can’t be something not-good-looking.
2. Why bikes?
Bikes have some real personal aspects. People add some special details, to customize their bikes and make them unique.  It’s easier to take pictures of them than other personal things. And the good thing is, that all the bikes look different, so it never gets boring.
As i could’t even decide, what kind of a bike i would like to have, i collect other peoples bikes and draw them. This makes me feel a bit, like their bikes are also mine a little bit and i don’t have to decide, how my bike would have to look like.
4. Who do you take your inspiration from?
There’s so many inspiration  if you just walk around with open eyes you can do a lot things  with the stuff you find next to you.
5. Where are you based and why?
Right now i’m based in Berlin, to get new inspiration and concentrate just on drawing.
6.  What kind of bike do you ride?
At the moment i don’t have a bike. But at home i got a Gazelle ladies Bike and my fathers old Tigra Racing bike.
http://www.louiseisbjoern.ch/
+
girlsonwheelsmag:

NESKA POLITA - BIKE HOLDER by Ana V. Francés
NESKA POLITA is a support destined to park the bike in a functional and esthetic way in a reduced spaces. It is destined for young and dynamic people who value the bike, as a functional transport and a static element.The form comes conceived by concepts which are attributed to the bike such as simplicity, environmental friendliness and low economy. The wood prevents wall soiling and the support in a leather holder is adaptable to all types of tires, avoiding scratches on them. 
1. How did your idea  come up?
In the studio we are people who have been using bike practically the whole life and we wanted to do something about it. The idea came from the simple observation of a problem, in my case I am a student and have lived in several rented flats in which I have always had the same problem; Where do I leave my bike?. We made an observation and investigation phase and we realized that this problem is repeated many times.
The bike has many positive aspects as economics, simplicity, ecology, healthy living … with Neska polita, we wanted to include its look in a part of a house every day.
Once the prototype done we were offered to include it in a Spanish crowfunding platform with what we could have more diffusion and as a resume, the project was successful.
2. WhY this name “Neska- Polita?
Neska polita is an expression in Euskera language that means “pretty girl”. With our holder, it was that we wanted to transmit, the bike as aesthetic and decorative element and practical too.
Neska polita is a holder bike in which you show your bike to others and the bike is the main element, no the holder. It is a way to be proud of your “pretty girl”.
The reason why it is written in Euskera language is because it is one of the communities that more use and importance give to bicycles as transportation; as well my mother is from there and is a place that I have much affection.
3. Why a bike support?
The idea of a holder bike came as a solution for own problem and a many people problem too which is not find a specific space to leave the bike, whether for space or lack of “parking”.
Currently the bike world as a static level is booming but otherwise most people still keeping the bike on the terrace or in the garage. That is why we decided to design a bicycle holder also save space and create a specific place to leave it at home and the bike serves as a decorative element in your living room, bedroom…
The bike goes from being a nuisance to being an aesthetic element.
4. Where are you based and why?
In the study we always focus more on the conceptual phase, we are a young studio, made by designers from 22 to 24 years old and this is the phase where we are most comfortable.
When we designed Neska polita, we wanted to emphasize the emotional bond that is created between users and bicycle and formally express the simplicity that now reigns in the world of bikes, so we decided to focus on very simple elements, but effectives at the same time, that each item fulfills its function.
Moreover we wanted all the attention it will take by the bike, we didn´t  want to make a holder that will steal part of this role, so we follow a very simple aesthetic element, which fit with the other furniture in the house but go unnoticed.
5. Which bike do you ride?
Two years ago I rescued a frame from a Torrot bike which my father had around the attic and I turned it into fixed gear. I adapted the rest of the pieces from other bikes or I have purchased the rest. I have always used the bicycle as transportation and currently it is this bike which I use every day.
6. Any Future project?
We always have something to do in the studio, we not close to anything and we find very interesting the fact to experiment with product design, graphics and photography. Personally it takes my attention the developments which are taking 3D printing and everything to do with it, so surely we will do something about it soon.

http://www.lap-so.com/
girlsonwheelsmag:

NESKA POLITA - BIKE HOLDER by Ana V. Francés
NESKA POLITA is a support destined to park the bike in a functional and esthetic way in a reduced spaces. It is destined for young and dynamic people who value the bike, as a functional transport and a static element.The form comes conceived by concepts which are attributed to the bike such as simplicity, environmental friendliness and low economy. The wood prevents wall soiling and the support in a leather holder is adaptable to all types of tires, avoiding scratches on them. 
1. How did your idea  come up?
In the studio we are people who have been using bike practically the whole life and we wanted to do something about it. The idea came from the simple observation of a problem, in my case I am a student and have lived in several rented flats in which I have always had the same problem; Where do I leave my bike?. We made an observation and investigation phase and we realized that this problem is repeated many times.
The bike has many positive aspects as economics, simplicity, ecology, healthy living … with Neska polita, we wanted to include its look in a part of a house every day.
Once the prototype done we were offered to include it in a Spanish crowfunding platform with what we could have more diffusion and as a resume, the project was successful.
2. WhY this name “Neska- Polita?
Neska polita is an expression in Euskera language that means “pretty girl”. With our holder, it was that we wanted to transmit, the bike as aesthetic and decorative element and practical too.
Neska polita is a holder bike in which you show your bike to others and the bike is the main element, no the holder. It is a way to be proud of your “pretty girl”.
The reason why it is written in Euskera language is because it is one of the communities that more use and importance give to bicycles as transportation; as well my mother is from there and is a place that I have much affection.
3. Why a bike support?
The idea of a holder bike came as a solution for own problem and a many people problem too which is not find a specific space to leave the bike, whether for space or lack of “parking”.
Currently the bike world as a static level is booming but otherwise most people still keeping the bike on the terrace or in the garage. That is why we decided to design a bicycle holder also save space and create a specific place to leave it at home and the bike serves as a decorative element in your living room, bedroom…
The bike goes from being a nuisance to being an aesthetic element.
4. Where are you based and why?
In the study we always focus more on the conceptual phase, we are a young studio, made by designers from 22 to 24 years old and this is the phase where we are most comfortable.
When we designed Neska polita, we wanted to emphasize the emotional bond that is created between users and bicycle and formally express the simplicity that now reigns in the world of bikes, so we decided to focus on very simple elements, but effectives at the same time, that each item fulfills its function.
Moreover we wanted all the attention it will take by the bike, we didn´t  want to make a holder that will steal part of this role, so we follow a very simple aesthetic element, which fit with the other furniture in the house but go unnoticed.
5. Which bike do you ride?
Two years ago I rescued a frame from a Torrot bike which my father had around the attic and I turned it into fixed gear. I adapted the rest of the pieces from other bikes or I have purchased the rest. I have always used the bicycle as transportation and currently it is this bike which I use every day.
6. Any Future project?
We always have something to do in the studio, we not close to anything and we find very interesting the fact to experiment with product design, graphics and photography. Personally it takes my attention the developments which are taking 3D printing and everything to do with it, so surely we will do something about it soon.

http://www.lap-so.com/
girlsonwheelsmag:

NESKA POLITA - BIKE HOLDER by Ana V. Francés
NESKA POLITA is a support destined to park the bike in a functional and esthetic way in a reduced spaces. It is destined for young and dynamic people who value the bike, as a functional transport and a static element.The form comes conceived by concepts which are attributed to the bike such as simplicity, environmental friendliness and low economy. The wood prevents wall soiling and the support in a leather holder is adaptable to all types of tires, avoiding scratches on them. 
1. How did your idea  come up?
In the studio we are people who have been using bike practically the whole life and we wanted to do something about it. The idea came from the simple observation of a problem, in my case I am a student and have lived in several rented flats in which I have always had the same problem; Where do I leave my bike?. We made an observation and investigation phase and we realized that this problem is repeated many times.
The bike has many positive aspects as economics, simplicity, ecology, healthy living … with Neska polita, we wanted to include its look in a part of a house every day.
Once the prototype done we were offered to include it in a Spanish crowfunding platform with what we could have more diffusion and as a resume, the project was successful.
2. WhY this name “Neska- Polita?
Neska polita is an expression in Euskera language that means “pretty girl”. With our holder, it was that we wanted to transmit, the bike as aesthetic and decorative element and practical too.
Neska polita is a holder bike in which you show your bike to others and the bike is the main element, no the holder. It is a way to be proud of your “pretty girl”.
The reason why it is written in Euskera language is because it is one of the communities that more use and importance give to bicycles as transportation; as well my mother is from there and is a place that I have much affection.
3. Why a bike support?
The idea of a holder bike came as a solution for own problem and a many people problem too which is not find a specific space to leave the bike, whether for space or lack of “parking”.
Currently the bike world as a static level is booming but otherwise most people still keeping the bike on the terrace or in the garage. That is why we decided to design a bicycle holder also save space and create a specific place to leave it at home and the bike serves as a decorative element in your living room, bedroom…
The bike goes from being a nuisance to being an aesthetic element.
4. Where are you based and why?
In the study we always focus more on the conceptual phase, we are a young studio, made by designers from 22 to 24 years old and this is the phase where we are most comfortable.
When we designed Neska polita, we wanted to emphasize the emotional bond that is created between users and bicycle and formally express the simplicity that now reigns in the world of bikes, so we decided to focus on very simple elements, but effectives at the same time, that each item fulfills its function.
Moreover we wanted all the attention it will take by the bike, we didn´t  want to make a holder that will steal part of this role, so we follow a very simple aesthetic element, which fit with the other furniture in the house but go unnoticed.
5. Which bike do you ride?
Two years ago I rescued a frame from a Torrot bike which my father had around the attic and I turned it into fixed gear. I adapted the rest of the pieces from other bikes or I have purchased the rest. I have always used the bicycle as transportation and currently it is this bike which I use every day.
6. Any Future project?
We always have something to do in the studio, we not close to anything and we find very interesting the fact to experiment with product design, graphics and photography. Personally it takes my attention the developments which are taking 3D printing and everything to do with it, so surely we will do something about it soon.

http://www.lap-so.com/
+
girlsonwheelsmag:

MAKING MUSIC WITH A BIKE, by Ana V. Francés
Composer Johnnyrandom breaks new ground with musical compositions made exclusively from everyday objects. His debut single, “Bespoken”, explores the full potential of sounds generated from bicycles and their components, transcending the role of traditional instrumentation as the accepted method for creating beautiful and thought-provoking music. The following video gives a glimpse into the creative process behind this unique composition. (text by Johnny Random) 
Johnny Random I Bespoken

1. Tell us about the project it in a few lines
“Bespoken” explores the musical potential of sounds generated from bicycles and their components. It is the first part in a series of releases that utilize everyday objects as a medium for composition.

2. Where did the idea of “Bespoken” come from?
When I was about 5 years old, I had begun to imagine my bike in a musical context. In the early 90’s I began to record and experiment with found objects as instruments, but was never fully satisfied with the results. It wasn’t until recently that I could play and capture bicycle sounds in a way that gave me a sonic palette that was diverse enough to create what I had imagined.

3. Why bikes?  Why music?
Bicycles are such a perfect system with so many beautiful sounding parts. “Bespoken” used a small fraction of those sounds, mostly because the goal was to create music that was more melodic and harmonic, rather than percussive.

4. Who do you take your inspiration from?
What I hear in music and what I hear in my environment sort of overlap. I am inspired by a very long list of composers and songwriters mixed with things like the shimmering, bell-like sound of a teaspoon hitting the side of a bowl or a mockingbird singing outside of my window.

5. Where are you based and why?
I live in the Bay Area of California for a variety of reasons - Beautiful and dynamic geography, progressive thinking, access to cultural diversity… I’ve moved away several times, but always end up back here.

6.  What kind of bike do you ride?

My favorite is a Specialized Stumpjumper. It was a great source for bass lines (guitar pick on knobby tires) on “Bespoken”. :)


“Bespoken” on iTunes: goo.gl/DX8uI1
“Bespoken (Inverted MTB Remix) on iTunes: goo.gl/dsHUdV
“Bespoken” - A breakdown of selected sound elements: soundcloud.com/johnnyrandom
http://www.johnnyrandom.com/
girlsonwheelsmag:

MAKING MUSIC WITH A BIKE, by Ana V. Francés
Composer Johnnyrandom breaks new ground with musical compositions made exclusively from everyday objects. His debut single, “Bespoken”, explores the full potential of sounds generated from bicycles and their components, transcending the role of traditional instrumentation as the accepted method for creating beautiful and thought-provoking music. The following video gives a glimpse into the creative process behind this unique composition. (text by Johnny Random) 
Johnny Random I Bespoken

1. Tell us about the project it in a few lines
“Bespoken” explores the musical potential of sounds generated from bicycles and their components. It is the first part in a series of releases that utilize everyday objects as a medium for composition.

2. Where did the idea of “Bespoken” come from?
When I was about 5 years old, I had begun to imagine my bike in a musical context. In the early 90’s I began to record and experiment with found objects as instruments, but was never fully satisfied with the results. It wasn’t until recently that I could play and capture bicycle sounds in a way that gave me a sonic palette that was diverse enough to create what I had imagined.

3. Why bikes?  Why music?
Bicycles are such a perfect system with so many beautiful sounding parts. “Bespoken” used a small fraction of those sounds, mostly because the goal was to create music that was more melodic and harmonic, rather than percussive.

4. Who do you take your inspiration from?
What I hear in music and what I hear in my environment sort of overlap. I am inspired by a very long list of composers and songwriters mixed with things like the shimmering, bell-like sound of a teaspoon hitting the side of a bowl or a mockingbird singing outside of my window.

5. Where are you based and why?
I live in the Bay Area of California for a variety of reasons - Beautiful and dynamic geography, progressive thinking, access to cultural diversity… I’ve moved away several times, but always end up back here.

6.  What kind of bike do you ride?

My favorite is a Specialized Stumpjumper. It was a great source for bass lines (guitar pick on knobby tires) on “Bespoken”. :)


“Bespoken” on iTunes: goo.gl/DX8uI1
“Bespoken (Inverted MTB Remix) on iTunes: goo.gl/dsHUdV
“Bespoken” - A breakdown of selected sound elements: soundcloud.com/johnnyrandom
http://www.johnnyrandom.com/
girlsonwheelsmag:

MAKING MUSIC WITH A BIKE, by Ana V. Francés
Composer Johnnyrandom breaks new ground with musical compositions made exclusively from everyday objects. His debut single, “Bespoken”, explores the full potential of sounds generated from bicycles and their components, transcending the role of traditional instrumentation as the accepted method for creating beautiful and thought-provoking music. The following video gives a glimpse into the creative process behind this unique composition. (text by Johnny Random) 
Johnny Random I Bespoken

1. Tell us about the project it in a few lines
“Bespoken” explores the musical potential of sounds generated from bicycles and their components. It is the first part in a series of releases that utilize everyday objects as a medium for composition.

2. Where did the idea of “Bespoken” come from?
When I was about 5 years old, I had begun to imagine my bike in a musical context. In the early 90’s I began to record and experiment with found objects as instruments, but was never fully satisfied with the results. It wasn’t until recently that I could play and capture bicycle sounds in a way that gave me a sonic palette that was diverse enough to create what I had imagined.

3. Why bikes?  Why music?
Bicycles are such a perfect system with so many beautiful sounding parts. “Bespoken” used a small fraction of those sounds, mostly because the goal was to create music that was more melodic and harmonic, rather than percussive.

4. Who do you take your inspiration from?
What I hear in music and what I hear in my environment sort of overlap. I am inspired by a very long list of composers and songwriters mixed with things like the shimmering, bell-like sound of a teaspoon hitting the side of a bowl or a mockingbird singing outside of my window.

5. Where are you based and why?
I live in the Bay Area of California for a variety of reasons - Beautiful and dynamic geography, progressive thinking, access to cultural diversity… I’ve moved away several times, but always end up back here.

6.  What kind of bike do you ride?

My favorite is a Specialized Stumpjumper. It was a great source for bass lines (guitar pick on knobby tires) on “Bespoken”. :)


“Bespoken” on iTunes: goo.gl/DX8uI1
“Bespoken (Inverted MTB Remix) on iTunes: goo.gl/dsHUdV
“Bespoken” - A breakdown of selected sound elements: soundcloud.com/johnnyrandom
http://www.johnnyrandom.com/
girlsonwheelsmag:

MAKING MUSIC WITH A BIKE, by Ana V. Francés
Composer Johnnyrandom breaks new ground with musical compositions made exclusively from everyday objects. His debut single, “Bespoken”, explores the full potential of sounds generated from bicycles and their components, transcending the role of traditional instrumentation as the accepted method for creating beautiful and thought-provoking music. The following video gives a glimpse into the creative process behind this unique composition. (text by Johnny Random) 
Johnny Random I Bespoken

1. Tell us about the project it in a few lines
“Bespoken” explores the musical potential of sounds generated from bicycles and their components. It is the first part in a series of releases that utilize everyday objects as a medium for composition.

2. Where did the idea of “Bespoken” come from?
When I was about 5 years old, I had begun to imagine my bike in a musical context. In the early 90’s I began to record and experiment with found objects as instruments, but was never fully satisfied with the results. It wasn’t until recently that I could play and capture bicycle sounds in a way that gave me a sonic palette that was diverse enough to create what I had imagined.

3. Why bikes?  Why music?
Bicycles are such a perfect system with so many beautiful sounding parts. “Bespoken” used a small fraction of those sounds, mostly because the goal was to create music that was more melodic and harmonic, rather than percussive.

4. Who do you take your inspiration from?
What I hear in music and what I hear in my environment sort of overlap. I am inspired by a very long list of composers and songwriters mixed with things like the shimmering, bell-like sound of a teaspoon hitting the side of a bowl or a mockingbird singing outside of my window.

5. Where are you based and why?
I live in the Bay Area of California for a variety of reasons - Beautiful and dynamic geography, progressive thinking, access to cultural diversity… I’ve moved away several times, but always end up back here.

6.  What kind of bike do you ride?

My favorite is a Specialized Stumpjumper. It was a great source for bass lines (guitar pick on knobby tires) on “Bespoken”. :)


“Bespoken” on iTunes: goo.gl/DX8uI1
“Bespoken (Inverted MTB Remix) on iTunes: goo.gl/dsHUdV
“Bespoken” - A breakdown of selected sound elements: soundcloud.com/johnnyrandom
http://www.johnnyrandom.com/
girlsonwheelsmag:

MAKING MUSIC WITH A BIKE, by Ana V. Francés
Composer Johnnyrandom breaks new ground with musical compositions made exclusively from everyday objects. His debut single, “Bespoken”, explores the full potential of sounds generated from bicycles and their components, transcending the role of traditional instrumentation as the accepted method for creating beautiful and thought-provoking music. The following video gives a glimpse into the creative process behind this unique composition. (text by Johnny Random) 
Johnny Random I Bespoken

1. Tell us about the project it in a few lines
“Bespoken” explores the musical potential of sounds generated from bicycles and their components. It is the first part in a series of releases that utilize everyday objects as a medium for composition.

2. Where did the idea of “Bespoken” come from?
When I was about 5 years old, I had begun to imagine my bike in a musical context. In the early 90’s I began to record and experiment with found objects as instruments, but was never fully satisfied with the results. It wasn’t until recently that I could play and capture bicycle sounds in a way that gave me a sonic palette that was diverse enough to create what I had imagined.

3. Why bikes?  Why music?
Bicycles are such a perfect system with so many beautiful sounding parts. “Bespoken” used a small fraction of those sounds, mostly because the goal was to create music that was more melodic and harmonic, rather than percussive.

4. Who do you take your inspiration from?
What I hear in music and what I hear in my environment sort of overlap. I am inspired by a very long list of composers and songwriters mixed with things like the shimmering, bell-like sound of a teaspoon hitting the side of a bowl or a mockingbird singing outside of my window.

5. Where are you based and why?
I live in the Bay Area of California for a variety of reasons - Beautiful and dynamic geography, progressive thinking, access to cultural diversity… I’ve moved away several times, but always end up back here.

6.  What kind of bike do you ride?

My favorite is a Specialized Stumpjumper. It was a great source for bass lines (guitar pick on knobby tires) on “Bespoken”. :)


“Bespoken” on iTunes: goo.gl/DX8uI1
“Bespoken (Inverted MTB Remix) on iTunes: goo.gl/dsHUdV
“Bespoken” - A breakdown of selected sound elements: soundcloud.com/johnnyrandom
http://www.johnnyrandom.com/
girlsonwheelsmag:

MAKING MUSIC WITH A BIKE, by Ana V. Francés
Composer Johnnyrandom breaks new ground with musical compositions made exclusively from everyday objects. His debut single, “Bespoken”, explores the full potential of sounds generated from bicycles and their components, transcending the role of traditional instrumentation as the accepted method for creating beautiful and thought-provoking music. The following video gives a glimpse into the creative process behind this unique composition. (text by Johnny Random) 
Johnny Random I Bespoken

1. Tell us about the project it in a few lines
“Bespoken” explores the musical potential of sounds generated from bicycles and their components. It is the first part in a series of releases that utilize everyday objects as a medium for composition.

2. Where did the idea of “Bespoken” come from?
When I was about 5 years old, I had begun to imagine my bike in a musical context. In the early 90’s I began to record and experiment with found objects as instruments, but was never fully satisfied with the results. It wasn’t until recently that I could play and capture bicycle sounds in a way that gave me a sonic palette that was diverse enough to create what I had imagined.

3. Why bikes?  Why music?
Bicycles are such a perfect system with so many beautiful sounding parts. “Bespoken” used a small fraction of those sounds, mostly because the goal was to create music that was more melodic and harmonic, rather than percussive.

4. Who do you take your inspiration from?
What I hear in music and what I hear in my environment sort of overlap. I am inspired by a very long list of composers and songwriters mixed with things like the shimmering, bell-like sound of a teaspoon hitting the side of a bowl or a mockingbird singing outside of my window.

5. Where are you based and why?
I live in the Bay Area of California for a variety of reasons - Beautiful and dynamic geography, progressive thinking, access to cultural diversity… I’ve moved away several times, but always end up back here.

6.  What kind of bike do you ride?

My favorite is a Specialized Stumpjumper. It was a great source for bass lines (guitar pick on knobby tires) on “Bespoken”. :)


“Bespoken” on iTunes: goo.gl/DX8uI1
“Bespoken (Inverted MTB Remix) on iTunes: goo.gl/dsHUdV
“Bespoken” - A breakdown of selected sound elements: soundcloud.com/johnnyrandom
http://www.johnnyrandom.com/
girlsonwheelsmag:

MAKING MUSIC WITH A BIKE, by Ana V. Francés
Composer Johnnyrandom breaks new ground with musical compositions made exclusively from everyday objects. His debut single, “Bespoken”, explores the full potential of sounds generated from bicycles and their components, transcending the role of traditional instrumentation as the accepted method for creating beautiful and thought-provoking music. The following video gives a glimpse into the creative process behind this unique composition. (text by Johnny Random) 
Johnny Random I Bespoken

1. Tell us about the project it in a few lines
“Bespoken” explores the musical potential of sounds generated from bicycles and their components. It is the first part in a series of releases that utilize everyday objects as a medium for composition.

2. Where did the idea of “Bespoken” come from?
When I was about 5 years old, I had begun to imagine my bike in a musical context. In the early 90’s I began to record and experiment with found objects as instruments, but was never fully satisfied with the results. It wasn’t until recently that I could play and capture bicycle sounds in a way that gave me a sonic palette that was diverse enough to create what I had imagined.

3. Why bikes?  Why music?
Bicycles are such a perfect system with so many beautiful sounding parts. “Bespoken” used a small fraction of those sounds, mostly because the goal was to create music that was more melodic and harmonic, rather than percussive.

4. Who do you take your inspiration from?
What I hear in music and what I hear in my environment sort of overlap. I am inspired by a very long list of composers and songwriters mixed with things like the shimmering, bell-like sound of a teaspoon hitting the side of a bowl or a mockingbird singing outside of my window.

5. Where are you based and why?
I live in the Bay Area of California for a variety of reasons - Beautiful and dynamic geography, progressive thinking, access to cultural diversity… I’ve moved away several times, but always end up back here.

6.  What kind of bike do you ride?

My favorite is a Specialized Stumpjumper. It was a great source for bass lines (guitar pick on knobby tires) on “Bespoken”. :)


“Bespoken” on iTunes: goo.gl/DX8uI1
“Bespoken (Inverted MTB Remix) on iTunes: goo.gl/dsHUdV
“Bespoken” - A breakdown of selected sound elements: soundcloud.com/johnnyrandom
http://www.johnnyrandom.com/
+
girlsonwheelsmag:

MANU CAMPA THE BIKE ARTIST
I was bike born in 2007. I studied Fine Arts and took my last year in Holland. It was there where I discovered biking and I brought a big Dutch Gazelle with me when I came back, even with the big wooden box. I haven’t stopped pedaling science then, and luckily I haven’t stopped painting either, I’m making a living out of my art.

The combination between these two came a bit longer than a year ago. 
I don’t know how it didn’t come out earlier, having a studio full of the old bikes I fix and collect. 

The result of all this is the collection of more than 15 paintings that I have exhibited (and sold most of it). I feel they are a part of me. I inspire in my own bikes, in my esthetic view of the design and the chromed details. 


www.manucampa.com
Manucampa.blogspot.com
girlsonwheelsmag:

MANU CAMPA THE BIKE ARTIST
I was bike born in 2007. I studied Fine Arts and took my last year in Holland. It was there where I discovered biking and I brought a big Dutch Gazelle with me when I came back, even with the big wooden box. I haven’t stopped pedaling science then, and luckily I haven’t stopped painting either, I’m making a living out of my art.

The combination between these two came a bit longer than a year ago. 
I don’t know how it didn’t come out earlier, having a studio full of the old bikes I fix and collect. 

The result of all this is the collection of more than 15 paintings that I have exhibited (and sold most of it). I feel they are a part of me. I inspire in my own bikes, in my esthetic view of the design and the chromed details. 


www.manucampa.com
Manucampa.blogspot.com
girlsonwheelsmag:

MANU CAMPA THE BIKE ARTIST
I was bike born in 2007. I studied Fine Arts and took my last year in Holland. It was there where I discovered biking and I brought a big Dutch Gazelle with me when I came back, even with the big wooden box. I haven’t stopped pedaling science then, and luckily I haven’t stopped painting either, I’m making a living out of my art.

The combination between these two came a bit longer than a year ago. 
I don’t know how it didn’t come out earlier, having a studio full of the old bikes I fix and collect. 

The result of all this is the collection of more than 15 paintings that I have exhibited (and sold most of it). I feel they are a part of me. I inspire in my own bikes, in my esthetic view of the design and the chromed details. 


www.manucampa.com
Manucampa.blogspot.com
girlsonwheelsmag:

MANU CAMPA THE BIKE ARTIST
I was bike born in 2007. I studied Fine Arts and took my last year in Holland. It was there where I discovered biking and I brought a big Dutch Gazelle with me when I came back, even with the big wooden box. I haven’t stopped pedaling science then, and luckily I haven’t stopped painting either, I’m making a living out of my art.

The combination between these two came a bit longer than a year ago. 
I don’t know how it didn’t come out earlier, having a studio full of the old bikes I fix and collect. 

The result of all this is the collection of more than 15 paintings that I have exhibited (and sold most of it). I feel they are a part of me. I inspire in my own bikes, in my esthetic view of the design and the chromed details. 


www.manucampa.com
Manucampa.blogspot.com
girlsonwheelsmag:

MANU CAMPA THE BIKE ARTIST
I was bike born in 2007. I studied Fine Arts and took my last year in Holland. It was there where I discovered biking and I brought a big Dutch Gazelle with me when I came back, even with the big wooden box. I haven’t stopped pedaling science then, and luckily I haven’t stopped painting either, I’m making a living out of my art.

The combination between these two came a bit longer than a year ago. 
I don’t know how it didn’t come out earlier, having a studio full of the old bikes I fix and collect. 

The result of all this is the collection of more than 15 paintings that I have exhibited (and sold most of it). I feel they are a part of me. I inspire in my own bikes, in my esthetic view of the design and the chromed details. 


www.manucampa.com
Manucampa.blogspot.com
girlsonwheelsmag:

MANU CAMPA THE BIKE ARTIST
I was bike born in 2007. I studied Fine Arts and took my last year in Holland. It was there where I discovered biking and I brought a big Dutch Gazelle with me when I came back, even with the big wooden box. I haven’t stopped pedaling science then, and luckily I haven’t stopped painting either, I’m making a living out of my art.

The combination between these two came a bit longer than a year ago. 
I don’t know how it didn’t come out earlier, having a studio full of the old bikes I fix and collect. 

The result of all this is the collection of more than 15 paintings that I have exhibited (and sold most of it). I feel they are a part of me. I inspire in my own bikes, in my esthetic view of the design and the chromed details. 


www.manucampa.com
Manucampa.blogspot.com
girlsonwheelsmag:

MANU CAMPA THE BIKE ARTIST
I was bike born in 2007. I studied Fine Arts and took my last year in Holland. It was there where I discovered biking and I brought a big Dutch Gazelle with me when I came back, even with the big wooden box. I haven’t stopped pedaling science then, and luckily I haven’t stopped painting either, I’m making a living out of my art.

The combination between these two came a bit longer than a year ago. 
I don’t know how it didn’t come out earlier, having a studio full of the old bikes I fix and collect. 

The result of all this is the collection of more than 15 paintings that I have exhibited (and sold most of it). I feel they are a part of me. I inspire in my own bikes, in my esthetic view of the design and the chromed details. 


www.manucampa.com
Manucampa.blogspot.com
girlsonwheelsmag:

MANU CAMPA THE BIKE ARTIST
I was bike born in 2007. I studied Fine Arts and took my last year in Holland. It was there where I discovered biking and I brought a big Dutch Gazelle with me when I came back, even with the big wooden box. I haven’t stopped pedaling science then, and luckily I haven’t stopped painting either, I’m making a living out of my art.

The combination between these two came a bit longer than a year ago. 
I don’t know how it didn’t come out earlier, having a studio full of the old bikes I fix and collect. 

The result of all this is the collection of more than 15 paintings that I have exhibited (and sold most of it). I feel they are a part of me. I inspire in my own bikes, in my esthetic view of the design and the chromed details. 


www.manucampa.com
Manucampa.blogspot.com
+
girlsonwheelsmag:

Bike polo Girls made in Vlc by Grace García
1. How do you see the female bike polo?
Female bikepolo doesn’t have to be jealous of male bikepolo. As we discovered in the last Hell’s Belles competition, the quality of the female teams are very high. Now we want to improve our game, we want to be as good as them! However, competitions are usually mixed, also the training teams. Even though there are more boys than girls, the number of women playing bike polo is increasing. In Valencia, at first, we were just two girls, now the team are equal.
2. Why a boke polo team?
When we train we don’t have a fixed team, we just play. However, to register for the competition a team was necessary. That’s how we got in touch with one of the Hell’s Belles organizers, Filipa, she didn’t have a team. So, we created “Jamón Ibérico” together.
3. When did you start playing bikepolo?
We are very interested in bikes and we learnt about this sport three years ago. However, people in Valencia played very irregularly at this time and it was one year ago when we started playing more regularly, once or twice for a week.

4. What kind of bike do you ride?
We want to use this moment to clarify that, contrary to popular belief, fixies aren’t the most appropriated bikes to play bikepolo. The best choice is to play with a single speed with front or double brake and with a very short gear ratio. The frame is better if it’s compact and resistant because it’s going to be hit for sure. We both began playing with bikes that we had to replace because we appreciated them. Now we use some old MTB frames and we don’t have any problem if we crash or we fall. Anyway, in the future we hope save some money to buy a frame or bike that meets our specific needs. Like in all sports, as you play, you become more demanding but if you are going to begin to play you can use any bike you have.
girlsonwheelsmag:

Bike polo Girls made in Vlc by Grace García
1. How do you see the female bike polo?
Female bikepolo doesn’t have to be jealous of male bikepolo. As we discovered in the last Hell’s Belles competition, the quality of the female teams are very high. Now we want to improve our game, we want to be as good as them! However, competitions are usually mixed, also the training teams. Even though there are more boys than girls, the number of women playing bike polo is increasing. In Valencia, at first, we were just two girls, now the team are equal.
2. Why a boke polo team?
When we train we don’t have a fixed team, we just play. However, to register for the competition a team was necessary. That’s how we got in touch with one of the Hell’s Belles organizers, Filipa, she didn’t have a team. So, we created “Jamón Ibérico” together.
3. When did you start playing bikepolo?
We are very interested in bikes and we learnt about this sport three years ago. However, people in Valencia played very irregularly at this time and it was one year ago when we started playing more regularly, once or twice for a week.

4. What kind of bike do you ride?
We want to use this moment to clarify that, contrary to popular belief, fixies aren’t the most appropriated bikes to play bikepolo. The best choice is to play with a single speed with front or double brake and with a very short gear ratio. The frame is better if it’s compact and resistant because it’s going to be hit for sure. We both began playing with bikes that we had to replace because we appreciated them. Now we use some old MTB frames and we don’t have any problem if we crash or we fall. Anyway, in the future we hope save some money to buy a frame or bike that meets our specific needs. Like in all sports, as you play, you become more demanding but if you are going to begin to play you can use any bike you have.
girlsonwheelsmag:

Bike polo Girls made in Vlc by Grace García
1. How do you see the female bike polo?
Female bikepolo doesn’t have to be jealous of male bikepolo. As we discovered in the last Hell’s Belles competition, the quality of the female teams are very high. Now we want to improve our game, we want to be as good as them! However, competitions are usually mixed, also the training teams. Even though there are more boys than girls, the number of women playing bike polo is increasing. In Valencia, at first, we were just two girls, now the team are equal.
2. Why a boke polo team?
When we train we don’t have a fixed team, we just play. However, to register for the competition a team was necessary. That’s how we got in touch with one of the Hell’s Belles organizers, Filipa, she didn’t have a team. So, we created “Jamón Ibérico” together.
3. When did you start playing bikepolo?
We are very interested in bikes and we learnt about this sport three years ago. However, people in Valencia played very irregularly at this time and it was one year ago when we started playing more regularly, once or twice for a week.

4. What kind of bike do you ride?
We want to use this moment to clarify that, contrary to popular belief, fixies aren’t the most appropriated bikes to play bikepolo. The best choice is to play with a single speed with front or double brake and with a very short gear ratio. The frame is better if it’s compact and resistant because it’s going to be hit for sure. We both began playing with bikes that we had to replace because we appreciated them. Now we use some old MTB frames and we don’t have any problem if we crash or we fall. Anyway, in the future we hope save some money to buy a frame or bike that meets our specific needs. Like in all sports, as you play, you become more demanding but if you are going to begin to play you can use any bike you have.
girlsonwheelsmag:

Bike polo Girls made in Vlc by Grace García
1. How do you see the female bike polo?
Female bikepolo doesn’t have to be jealous of male bikepolo. As we discovered in the last Hell’s Belles competition, the quality of the female teams are very high. Now we want to improve our game, we want to be as good as them! However, competitions are usually mixed, also the training teams. Even though there are more boys than girls, the number of women playing bike polo is increasing. In Valencia, at first, we were just two girls, now the team are equal.
2. Why a boke polo team?
When we train we don’t have a fixed team, we just play. However, to register for the competition a team was necessary. That’s how we got in touch with one of the Hell’s Belles organizers, Filipa, she didn’t have a team. So, we created “Jamón Ibérico” together.
3. When did you start playing bikepolo?
We are very interested in bikes and we learnt about this sport three years ago. However, people in Valencia played very irregularly at this time and it was one year ago when we started playing more regularly, once or twice for a week.

4. What kind of bike do you ride?
We want to use this moment to clarify that, contrary to popular belief, fixies aren’t the most appropriated bikes to play bikepolo. The best choice is to play with a single speed with front or double brake and with a very short gear ratio. The frame is better if it’s compact and resistant because it’s going to be hit for sure. We both began playing with bikes that we had to replace because we appreciated them. Now we use some old MTB frames and we don’t have any problem if we crash or we fall. Anyway, in the future we hope save some money to buy a frame or bike that meets our specific needs. Like in all sports, as you play, you become more demanding but if you are going to begin to play you can use any bike you have.
girlsonwheelsmag:

Bike polo Girls made in Vlc by Grace García
1. How do you see the female bike polo?
Female bikepolo doesn’t have to be jealous of male bikepolo. As we discovered in the last Hell’s Belles competition, the quality of the female teams are very high. Now we want to improve our game, we want to be as good as them! However, competitions are usually mixed, also the training teams. Even though there are more boys than girls, the number of women playing bike polo is increasing. In Valencia, at first, we were just two girls, now the team are equal.
2. Why a boke polo team?
When we train we don’t have a fixed team, we just play. However, to register for the competition a team was necessary. That’s how we got in touch with one of the Hell’s Belles organizers, Filipa, she didn’t have a team. So, we created “Jamón Ibérico” together.
3. When did you start playing bikepolo?
We are very interested in bikes and we learnt about this sport three years ago. However, people in Valencia played very irregularly at this time and it was one year ago when we started playing more regularly, once or twice for a week.

4. What kind of bike do you ride?
We want to use this moment to clarify that, contrary to popular belief, fixies aren’t the most appropriated bikes to play bikepolo. The best choice is to play with a single speed with front or double brake and with a very short gear ratio. The frame is better if it’s compact and resistant because it’s going to be hit for sure. We both began playing with bikes that we had to replace because we appreciated them. Now we use some old MTB frames and we don’t have any problem if we crash or we fall. Anyway, in the future we hope save some money to buy a frame or bike that meets our specific needs. Like in all sports, as you play, you become more demanding but if you are going to begin to play you can use any bike you have.
girlsonwheelsmag:

Bike polo Girls made in Vlc by Grace García
1. How do you see the female bike polo?
Female bikepolo doesn’t have to be jealous of male bikepolo. As we discovered in the last Hell’s Belles competition, the quality of the female teams are very high. Now we want to improve our game, we want to be as good as them! However, competitions are usually mixed, also the training teams. Even though there are more boys than girls, the number of women playing bike polo is increasing. In Valencia, at first, we were just two girls, now the team are equal.
2. Why a boke polo team?
When we train we don’t have a fixed team, we just play. However, to register for the competition a team was necessary. That’s how we got in touch with one of the Hell’s Belles organizers, Filipa, she didn’t have a team. So, we created “Jamón Ibérico” together.
3. When did you start playing bikepolo?
We are very interested in bikes and we learnt about this sport three years ago. However, people in Valencia played very irregularly at this time and it was one year ago when we started playing more regularly, once or twice for a week.

4. What kind of bike do you ride?
We want to use this moment to clarify that, contrary to popular belief, fixies aren’t the most appropriated bikes to play bikepolo. The best choice is to play with a single speed with front or double brake and with a very short gear ratio. The frame is better if it’s compact and resistant because it’s going to be hit for sure. We both began playing with bikes that we had to replace because we appreciated them. Now we use some old MTB frames and we don’t have any problem if we crash or we fall. Anyway, in the future we hope save some money to buy a frame or bike that meets our specific needs. Like in all sports, as you play, you become more demanding but if you are going to begin to play you can use any bike you have.
girlsonwheelsmag:

Bike polo Girls made in Vlc by Grace García
1. How do you see the female bike polo?
Female bikepolo doesn’t have to be jealous of male bikepolo. As we discovered in the last Hell’s Belles competition, the quality of the female teams are very high. Now we want to improve our game, we want to be as good as them! However, competitions are usually mixed, also the training teams. Even though there are more boys than girls, the number of women playing bike polo is increasing. In Valencia, at first, we were just two girls, now the team are equal.
2. Why a boke polo team?
When we train we don’t have a fixed team, we just play. However, to register for the competition a team was necessary. That’s how we got in touch with one of the Hell’s Belles organizers, Filipa, she didn’t have a team. So, we created “Jamón Ibérico” together.
3. When did you start playing bikepolo?
We are very interested in bikes and we learnt about this sport three years ago. However, people in Valencia played very irregularly at this time and it was one year ago when we started playing more regularly, once or twice for a week.

4. What kind of bike do you ride?
We want to use this moment to clarify that, contrary to popular belief, fixies aren’t the most appropriated bikes to play bikepolo. The best choice is to play with a single speed with front or double brake and with a very short gear ratio. The frame is better if it’s compact and resistant because it’s going to be hit for sure. We both began playing with bikes that we had to replace because we appreciated them. Now we use some old MTB frames and we don’t have any problem if we crash or we fall. Anyway, in the future we hope save some money to buy a frame or bike that meets our specific needs. Like in all sports, as you play, you become more demanding but if you are going to begin to play you can use any bike you have.
+
girlsonwheelsmag:

LUCETTA MAGNETIC BIKE LIGHTS by Ana V. Francés
Lucetta by Emanuele Pizzolorusso  client: Palomar
Lucetta is an innovative set of two small magnetic bycicle lights. Easily attached to several differents parts of a bicycle, the two small lights - white for the front, red for the rear - are switched on and off with just one click. Designed to stay securely in place on even the bumpiest of roads, the lights give the option of a steady, slow or fast flashing beam, also selected with a simple click.

1. How did your idea “The lucetta” come up?
I came up with the idea of a magnetic bike light together with my brother Giancarlo one evening more than two years ago. 
2. Why bikes accessories ? 
 I myself use the bike every day…The world around bicycles is challenging because it includes practical needs, security issues and it relates to matters which influence quality of life in cities. At the same time, like all personal vehicles, the bike is an extension of the body and it therefore becomes something that represents you.

3. Who do you take your inspiration from?
I studied industrial design therefore course I have my mentors… I could mention three random names such as Bruno Munari, Dieter Rams, Jonathan Ive among others. However, I believe that my projects usually starts from personal situations of my daily life. I try to design things that I or my friends would actually use. I try to be honest with myself and see things from the prospective of the user, and if an idea doesn’t convince me 100% I abandon it immediately. Sometimes those lead to new projects though. 
4. Where are you based and why?
I am Italian but I live in Helsinki. I moved here for a Finnish girl, about three years ago. I cannot say I am based here specifically for work reasons, in fact at the moment I could work anywhere: I spent last summer working on a small balcony in the Gotic district of Barcelona for example.
5. Any future project?
Soon it’s going to come out a plant-pot I designed for an Hong Kong based company. Then I will focus on new ideas and projects… 
6. What kind of bike do you ride?
An old racing Bianchi, red one. It was my dad’s bike.
Photos and introduction text: lucetta website.
http://pizzolorusso.com/
girlsonwheelsmag:

LUCETTA MAGNETIC BIKE LIGHTS by Ana V. Francés
Lucetta by Emanuele Pizzolorusso  client: Palomar
Lucetta is an innovative set of two small magnetic bycicle lights. Easily attached to several differents parts of a bicycle, the two small lights - white for the front, red for the rear - are switched on and off with just one click. Designed to stay securely in place on even the bumpiest of roads, the lights give the option of a steady, slow or fast flashing beam, also selected with a simple click.

1. How did your idea “The lucetta” come up?
I came up with the idea of a magnetic bike light together with my brother Giancarlo one evening more than two years ago. 
2. Why bikes accessories ? 
 I myself use the bike every day…The world around bicycles is challenging because it includes practical needs, security issues and it relates to matters which influence quality of life in cities. At the same time, like all personal vehicles, the bike is an extension of the body and it therefore becomes something that represents you.

3. Who do you take your inspiration from?
I studied industrial design therefore course I have my mentors… I could mention three random names such as Bruno Munari, Dieter Rams, Jonathan Ive among others. However, I believe that my projects usually starts from personal situations of my daily life. I try to design things that I or my friends would actually use. I try to be honest with myself and see things from the prospective of the user, and if an idea doesn’t convince me 100% I abandon it immediately. Sometimes those lead to new projects though. 
4. Where are you based and why?
I am Italian but I live in Helsinki. I moved here for a Finnish girl, about three years ago. I cannot say I am based here specifically for work reasons, in fact at the moment I could work anywhere: I spent last summer working on a small balcony in the Gotic district of Barcelona for example.
5. Any future project?
Soon it’s going to come out a plant-pot I designed for an Hong Kong based company. Then I will focus on new ideas and projects… 
6. What kind of bike do you ride?
An old racing Bianchi, red one. It was my dad’s bike.
Photos and introduction text: lucetta website.
http://pizzolorusso.com/
girlsonwheelsmag:

LUCETTA MAGNETIC BIKE LIGHTS by Ana V. Francés
Lucetta by Emanuele Pizzolorusso  client: Palomar
Lucetta is an innovative set of two small magnetic bycicle lights. Easily attached to several differents parts of a bicycle, the two small lights - white for the front, red for the rear - are switched on and off with just one click. Designed to stay securely in place on even the bumpiest of roads, the lights give the option of a steady, slow or fast flashing beam, also selected with a simple click.

1. How did your idea “The lucetta” come up?
I came up with the idea of a magnetic bike light together with my brother Giancarlo one evening more than two years ago. 
2. Why bikes accessories ? 
 I myself use the bike every day…The world around bicycles is challenging because it includes practical needs, security issues and it relates to matters which influence quality of life in cities. At the same time, like all personal vehicles, the bike is an extension of the body and it therefore becomes something that represents you.

3. Who do you take your inspiration from?
I studied industrial design therefore course I have my mentors… I could mention three random names such as Bruno Munari, Dieter Rams, Jonathan Ive among others. However, I believe that my projects usually starts from personal situations of my daily life. I try to design things that I or my friends would actually use. I try to be honest with myself and see things from the prospective of the user, and if an idea doesn’t convince me 100% I abandon it immediately. Sometimes those lead to new projects though. 
4. Where are you based and why?
I am Italian but I live in Helsinki. I moved here for a Finnish girl, about three years ago. I cannot say I am based here specifically for work reasons, in fact at the moment I could work anywhere: I spent last summer working on a small balcony in the Gotic district of Barcelona for example.
5. Any future project?
Soon it’s going to come out a plant-pot I designed for an Hong Kong based company. Then I will focus on new ideas and projects… 
6. What kind of bike do you ride?
An old racing Bianchi, red one. It was my dad’s bike.
Photos and introduction text: lucetta website.
http://pizzolorusso.com/
girlsonwheelsmag:

LUCETTA MAGNETIC BIKE LIGHTS by Ana V. Francés
Lucetta by Emanuele Pizzolorusso  client: Palomar
Lucetta is an innovative set of two small magnetic bycicle lights. Easily attached to several differents parts of a bicycle, the two small lights - white for the front, red for the rear - are switched on and off with just one click. Designed to stay securely in place on even the bumpiest of roads, the lights give the option of a steady, slow or fast flashing beam, also selected with a simple click.

1. How did your idea “The lucetta” come up?
I came up with the idea of a magnetic bike light together with my brother Giancarlo one evening more than two years ago. 
2. Why bikes accessories ? 
 I myself use the bike every day…The world around bicycles is challenging because it includes practical needs, security issues and it relates to matters which influence quality of life in cities. At the same time, like all personal vehicles, the bike is an extension of the body and it therefore becomes something that represents you.

3. Who do you take your inspiration from?
I studied industrial design therefore course I have my mentors… I could mention three random names such as Bruno Munari, Dieter Rams, Jonathan Ive among others. However, I believe that my projects usually starts from personal situations of my daily life. I try to design things that I or my friends would actually use. I try to be honest with myself and see things from the prospective of the user, and if an idea doesn’t convince me 100% I abandon it immediately. Sometimes those lead to new projects though. 
4. Where are you based and why?
I am Italian but I live in Helsinki. I moved here for a Finnish girl, about three years ago. I cannot say I am based here specifically for work reasons, in fact at the moment I could work anywhere: I spent last summer working on a small balcony in the Gotic district of Barcelona for example.
5. Any future project?
Soon it’s going to come out a plant-pot I designed for an Hong Kong based company. Then I will focus on new ideas and projects… 
6. What kind of bike do you ride?
An old racing Bianchi, red one. It was my dad’s bike.
Photos and introduction text: lucetta website.
http://pizzolorusso.com/
girlsonwheelsmag:

LUCETTA MAGNETIC BIKE LIGHTS by Ana V. Francés
Lucetta by Emanuele Pizzolorusso  client: Palomar
Lucetta is an innovative set of two small magnetic bycicle lights. Easily attached to several differents parts of a bicycle, the two small lights - white for the front, red for the rear - are switched on and off with just one click. Designed to stay securely in place on even the bumpiest of roads, the lights give the option of a steady, slow or fast flashing beam, also selected with a simple click.

1. How did your idea “The lucetta” come up?
I came up with the idea of a magnetic bike light together with my brother Giancarlo one evening more than two years ago. 
2. Why bikes accessories ? 
 I myself use the bike every day…The world around bicycles is challenging because it includes practical needs, security issues and it relates to matters which influence quality of life in cities. At the same time, like all personal vehicles, the bike is an extension of the body and it therefore becomes something that represents you.

3. Who do you take your inspiration from?
I studied industrial design therefore course I have my mentors… I could mention three random names such as Bruno Munari, Dieter Rams, Jonathan Ive among others. However, I believe that my projects usually starts from personal situations of my daily life. I try to design things that I or my friends would actually use. I try to be honest with myself and see things from the prospective of the user, and if an idea doesn’t convince me 100% I abandon it immediately. Sometimes those lead to new projects though. 
4. Where are you based and why?
I am Italian but I live in Helsinki. I moved here for a Finnish girl, about three years ago. I cannot say I am based here specifically for work reasons, in fact at the moment I could work anywhere: I spent last summer working on a small balcony in the Gotic district of Barcelona for example.
5. Any future project?
Soon it’s going to come out a plant-pot I designed for an Hong Kong based company. Then I will focus on new ideas and projects… 
6. What kind of bike do you ride?
An old racing Bianchi, red one. It was my dad’s bike.
Photos and introduction text: lucetta website.
http://pizzolorusso.com/
girlsonwheelsmag:

LUCETTA MAGNETIC BIKE LIGHTS by Ana V. Francés
Lucetta by Emanuele Pizzolorusso  client: Palomar
Lucetta is an innovative set of two small magnetic bycicle lights. Easily attached to several differents parts of a bicycle, the two small lights - white for the front, red for the rear - are switched on and off with just one click. Designed to stay securely in place on even the bumpiest of roads, the lights give the option of a steady, slow or fast flashing beam, also selected with a simple click.

1. How did your idea “The lucetta” come up?
I came up with the idea of a magnetic bike light together with my brother Giancarlo one evening more than two years ago. 
2. Why bikes accessories ? 
 I myself use the bike every day…The world around bicycles is challenging because it includes practical needs, security issues and it relates to matters which influence quality of life in cities. At the same time, like all personal vehicles, the bike is an extension of the body and it therefore becomes something that represents you.

3. Who do you take your inspiration from?
I studied industrial design therefore course I have my mentors… I could mention three random names such as Bruno Munari, Dieter Rams, Jonathan Ive among others. However, I believe that my projects usually starts from personal situations of my daily life. I try to design things that I or my friends would actually use. I try to be honest with myself and see things from the prospective of the user, and if an idea doesn’t convince me 100% I abandon it immediately. Sometimes those lead to new projects though. 
4. Where are you based and why?
I am Italian but I live in Helsinki. I moved here for a Finnish girl, about three years ago. I cannot say I am based here specifically for work reasons, in fact at the moment I could work anywhere: I spent last summer working on a small balcony in the Gotic district of Barcelona for example.
5. Any future project?
Soon it’s going to come out a plant-pot I designed for an Hong Kong based company. Then I will focus on new ideas and projects… 
6. What kind of bike do you ride?
An old racing Bianchi, red one. It was my dad’s bike.
Photos and introduction text: lucetta website.
http://pizzolorusso.com/
girlsonwheelsmag:

LUCETTA MAGNETIC BIKE LIGHTS by Ana V. Francés
Lucetta by Emanuele Pizzolorusso  client: Palomar
Lucetta is an innovative set of two small magnetic bycicle lights. Easily attached to several differents parts of a bicycle, the two small lights - white for the front, red for the rear - are switched on and off with just one click. Designed to stay securely in place on even the bumpiest of roads, the lights give the option of a steady, slow or fast flashing beam, also selected with a simple click.

1. How did your idea “The lucetta” come up?
I came up with the idea of a magnetic bike light together with my brother Giancarlo one evening more than two years ago. 
2. Why bikes accessories ? 
 I myself use the bike every day…The world around bicycles is challenging because it includes practical needs, security issues and it relates to matters which influence quality of life in cities. At the same time, like all personal vehicles, the bike is an extension of the body and it therefore becomes something that represents you.

3. Who do you take your inspiration from?
I studied industrial design therefore course I have my mentors… I could mention three random names such as Bruno Munari, Dieter Rams, Jonathan Ive among others. However, I believe that my projects usually starts from personal situations of my daily life. I try to design things that I or my friends would actually use. I try to be honest with myself and see things from the prospective of the user, and if an idea doesn’t convince me 100% I abandon it immediately. Sometimes those lead to new projects though. 
4. Where are you based and why?
I am Italian but I live in Helsinki. I moved here for a Finnish girl, about three years ago. I cannot say I am based here specifically for work reasons, in fact at the moment I could work anywhere: I spent last summer working on a small balcony in the Gotic district of Barcelona for example.
5. Any future project?
Soon it’s going to come out a plant-pot I designed for an Hong Kong based company. Then I will focus on new ideas and projects… 
6. What kind of bike do you ride?
An old racing Bianchi, red one. It was my dad’s bike.
Photos and introduction text: lucetta website.
http://pizzolorusso.com/
girlsonwheelsmag:

LUCETTA MAGNETIC BIKE LIGHTS by Ana V. Francés
Lucetta by Emanuele Pizzolorusso  client: Palomar
Lucetta is an innovative set of two small magnetic bycicle lights. Easily attached to several differents parts of a bicycle, the two small lights - white for the front, red for the rear - are switched on and off with just one click. Designed to stay securely in place on even the bumpiest of roads, the lights give the option of a steady, slow or fast flashing beam, also selected with a simple click.

1. How did your idea “The lucetta” come up?
I came up with the idea of a magnetic bike light together with my brother Giancarlo one evening more than two years ago. 
2. Why bikes accessories ? 
 I myself use the bike every day…The world around bicycles is challenging because it includes practical needs, security issues and it relates to matters which influence quality of life in cities. At the same time, like all personal vehicles, the bike is an extension of the body and it therefore becomes something that represents you.

3. Who do you take your inspiration from?
I studied industrial design therefore course I have my mentors… I could mention three random names such as Bruno Munari, Dieter Rams, Jonathan Ive among others. However, I believe that my projects usually starts from personal situations of my daily life. I try to design things that I or my friends would actually use. I try to be honest with myself and see things from the prospective of the user, and if an idea doesn’t convince me 100% I abandon it immediately. Sometimes those lead to new projects though. 
4. Where are you based and why?
I am Italian but I live in Helsinki. I moved here for a Finnish girl, about three years ago. I cannot say I am based here specifically for work reasons, in fact at the moment I could work anywhere: I spent last summer working on a small balcony in the Gotic district of Barcelona for example.
5. Any future project?
Soon it’s going to come out a plant-pot I designed for an Hong Kong based company. Then I will focus on new ideas and projects… 
6. What kind of bike do you ride?
An old racing Bianchi, red one. It was my dad’s bike.
Photos and introduction text: lucetta website.
http://pizzolorusso.com/
+
girlsonwheelsmag:

Afghan Cycles by Ana V. Francés
"The bicycle has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world. It gives a woman a feeling of freedom and self-reliance. The moment she takes her seat she knows she can’t get into harm unless she gets off her bicycle, and away she goes, the picture of free, untrammeled womanhood." - Susan B. Anthony

1. Tell us about the project:
Afghan Cycles is a documentary film about the Women’s National Cycling Team of Afghanistan. We follow the girls from their daily lives to training, telling the story of what it means to be a female cyclist in an otherwise oppressive country.
2. where do the idea of the documentary come from? 
Our Producer and non profit partner, Shannon Galpin/Mountain2Mountain, approached me last winter to tell me about the women’s team that was taking shape in Afghanistan. I have known Shannon for years now, and have been inspired by her work in Afghanistan from the moment I met her. She was the first woman to mountain bike in Afghanistan, so when she discovered that a woman’s cycling team was forming, I could tell she was excited to tell the story. She came to me with the idea of making a film about them, and I was on board immediately. The structure of the film has evolved and changed shapes in a lot of ways. After meeting the girls, we quickly realized how important this story was, and it wasn’t just about the cycling team. It’s also about the social and cultural taboos that these women are challenging by riding the bike.
3. why girls? why bikes?
Participating in sport gives individuals something to passionate about, and it allows them to be a part of cohesive team. For women in an oppressive county, that team dynamic and passion for sport can be incredibly empowering. Our story is about how the bicycle achieves this, and we see the metaphor of “pedaling a revolution” applying directly with this team of women who are challenging gender barriers. The bicycle played a big role in the Women’s Suffrage Movement in the States, and we see a lot of parallels between that time in our history, and the women on the cycling team in Afghanistan. There are more girls joining sports teams in Afghanistan everyday - boxing, basketball, volleyball, even skateboarding. The bike has long since been a symbol of freedom for women, most notably during the women’s suffrage movement in the United States in the early 1900’s.  The activist Susan B Anthony famously quoted that nothing was more important for women than bikes in the fight for equality.   Around the world today, the bike is a vehicle for social justice and change… used to help combat gender violence in rural communities, increase access to education and healthcare, and to provide cheap transportation alternatives.  In Afghanistan, riding bikes for women is still seen as culturally offensive and revolutionary.  Women have never rode bikes in Afghanistan and finally seeing young women ride bikes in the post-Taliban era is thrilling and inspiring, and sign of change to come.  
4. why Afghanistan? what was your initial motivation to go there? 
Shannon first traveled to Afghanistan in 2008, to start her work with women’s rights and gender equity in what is repeatedly ranked, the worst country in the world to be a woman. She wanted to find unique ways to work on behalf of women and girls, and over the past 15 visits, she had been inspired by the resiliency and strength of the women and girls that prove their worth every day in a culture that places little value on the lives of women. The concept of using the bicycle as a metaphor to “pedal a revolution” is a universal theme. Our ultimate goal with the film is to get more women on bikes, but we’re focusing on the Afghan team because they live in one of the hardest places in the world to be a woman. Documenting the progress and success of this team will show women internationally that riding bikes can be possible for women everywhere.
5. How’s the feedback with the locals? In your time in Afghanistan, did you ever face a lot of opposition from the people of Kabul?  
Our time in Kabul was amazing. Everyone we met was so hospitable and interested in what we were doing. There were certainly the times where your heart starts beating a little bit faster though - we were an all female crew filming an all female cycling team. Knowing that the team has been threatened in the past, we felt a bit vulnerable a handful of times. But our experience was incredibly hospitable. People always wanted to know more about what we were doing. We had incredible access with support from the local police chief and Province Governors. 
(Shannon’s Perspective) My interactions with Afghans has been 99% positive.  Its a difficult place for women to work, its an even more difficult place for women to live.  Women have found their voice and are integrated into every aspect of Afghan society in urban areas like Kabul.  Educated Afghan men and boys value the role of women in society and are moving towards a more equal society, but the majority of Afghanistan is rural and uneducated and that creates a country with a wide spectrum of values and expectations.  The fact remains that this is still one of the most oppressive countries to be a woman, the Taliban are in control of many parts of the country, and women have to fight for their rights every step of the way.   The women that ride their bikes are taking risks that we would never expect to face in the West just to pedal a bicycle.  But they do this to express their rights, the normalcy of riding of a bike, and to challenge the gender norms.  That doesn’t happen without ruffling a few feathers. 
6. Any story  that touched you particularly? 
It’s difficult to say that one story touched me anymore than another story. With each of the girls, there was always that moment where we could feel them trust us wholeheartedly. It came in different forms for each of them, but when that shift happened through smiles, hand gestures, and broken English, it was always so special to me. In the beginning, we were total strangers, so asking them to open up to us about such taboo topics was a lot for them. When those walls fell and we connected on what felt like a deep and respectful level - well as a documentary filmmaker, that’s always a really special moment.
"Photo by - Claudia Lopez Photography"
"Film shots from the documental"
www.afghancycles.com
girlsonwheelsmag:

Afghan Cycles by Ana V. Francés
"The bicycle has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world. It gives a woman a feeling of freedom and self-reliance. The moment she takes her seat she knows she can’t get into harm unless she gets off her bicycle, and away she goes, the picture of free, untrammeled womanhood." - Susan B. Anthony

1. Tell us about the project:
Afghan Cycles is a documentary film about the Women’s National Cycling Team of Afghanistan. We follow the girls from their daily lives to training, telling the story of what it means to be a female cyclist in an otherwise oppressive country.
2. where do the idea of the documentary come from? 
Our Producer and non profit partner, Shannon Galpin/Mountain2Mountain, approached me last winter to tell me about the women’s team that was taking shape in Afghanistan. I have known Shannon for years now, and have been inspired by her work in Afghanistan from the moment I met her. She was the first woman to mountain bike in Afghanistan, so when she discovered that a woman’s cycling team was forming, I could tell she was excited to tell the story. She came to me with the idea of making a film about them, and I was on board immediately. The structure of the film has evolved and changed shapes in a lot of ways. After meeting the girls, we quickly realized how important this story was, and it wasn’t just about the cycling team. It’s also about the social and cultural taboos that these women are challenging by riding the bike.
3. why girls? why bikes?
Participating in sport gives individuals something to passionate about, and it allows them to be a part of cohesive team. For women in an oppressive county, that team dynamic and passion for sport can be incredibly empowering. Our story is about how the bicycle achieves this, and we see the metaphor of “pedaling a revolution” applying directly with this team of women who are challenging gender barriers. The bicycle played a big role in the Women’s Suffrage Movement in the States, and we see a lot of parallels between that time in our history, and the women on the cycling team in Afghanistan. There are more girls joining sports teams in Afghanistan everyday - boxing, basketball, volleyball, even skateboarding. The bike has long since been a symbol of freedom for women, most notably during the women’s suffrage movement in the United States in the early 1900’s.  The activist Susan B Anthony famously quoted that nothing was more important for women than bikes in the fight for equality.   Around the world today, the bike is a vehicle for social justice and change… used to help combat gender violence in rural communities, increase access to education and healthcare, and to provide cheap transportation alternatives.  In Afghanistan, riding bikes for women is still seen as culturally offensive and revolutionary.  Women have never rode bikes in Afghanistan and finally seeing young women ride bikes in the post-Taliban era is thrilling and inspiring, and sign of change to come.  
4. why Afghanistan? what was your initial motivation to go there? 
Shannon first traveled to Afghanistan in 2008, to start her work with women’s rights and gender equity in what is repeatedly ranked, the worst country in the world to be a woman. She wanted to find unique ways to work on behalf of women and girls, and over the past 15 visits, she had been inspired by the resiliency and strength of the women and girls that prove their worth every day in a culture that places little value on the lives of women. The concept of using the bicycle as a metaphor to “pedal a revolution” is a universal theme. Our ultimate goal with the film is to get more women on bikes, but we’re focusing on the Afghan team because they live in one of the hardest places in the world to be a woman. Documenting the progress and success of this team will show women internationally that riding bikes can be possible for women everywhere.
5. How’s the feedback with the locals? In your time in Afghanistan, did you ever face a lot of opposition from the people of Kabul?  
Our time in Kabul was amazing. Everyone we met was so hospitable and interested in what we were doing. There were certainly the times where your heart starts beating a little bit faster though - we were an all female crew filming an all female cycling team. Knowing that the team has been threatened in the past, we felt a bit vulnerable a handful of times. But our experience was incredibly hospitable. People always wanted to know more about what we were doing. We had incredible access with support from the local police chief and Province Governors. 
(Shannon’s Perspective) My interactions with Afghans has been 99% positive.  Its a difficult place for women to work, its an even more difficult place for women to live.  Women have found their voice and are integrated into every aspect of Afghan society in urban areas like Kabul.  Educated Afghan men and boys value the role of women in society and are moving towards a more equal society, but the majority of Afghanistan is rural and uneducated and that creates a country with a wide spectrum of values and expectations.  The fact remains that this is still one of the most oppressive countries to be a woman, the Taliban are in control of many parts of the country, and women have to fight for their rights every step of the way.   The women that ride their bikes are taking risks that we would never expect to face in the West just to pedal a bicycle.  But they do this to express their rights, the normalcy of riding of a bike, and to challenge the gender norms.  That doesn’t happen without ruffling a few feathers. 
6. Any story  that touched you particularly? 
It’s difficult to say that one story touched me anymore than another story. With each of the girls, there was always that moment where we could feel them trust us wholeheartedly. It came in different forms for each of them, but when that shift happened through smiles, hand gestures, and broken English, it was always so special to me. In the beginning, we were total strangers, so asking them to open up to us about such taboo topics was a lot for them. When those walls fell and we connected on what felt like a deep and respectful level - well as a documentary filmmaker, that’s always a really special moment.
"Photo by - Claudia Lopez Photography"
"Film shots from the documental"
www.afghancycles.com
girlsonwheelsmag:

Afghan Cycles by Ana V. Francés
"The bicycle has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world. It gives a woman a feeling of freedom and self-reliance. The moment she takes her seat she knows she can’t get into harm unless she gets off her bicycle, and away she goes, the picture of free, untrammeled womanhood." - Susan B. Anthony

1. Tell us about the project:
Afghan Cycles is a documentary film about the Women’s National Cycling Team of Afghanistan. We follow the girls from their daily lives to training, telling the story of what it means to be a female cyclist in an otherwise oppressive country.
2. where do the idea of the documentary come from? 
Our Producer and non profit partner, Shannon Galpin/Mountain2Mountain, approached me last winter to tell me about the women’s team that was taking shape in Afghanistan. I have known Shannon for years now, and have been inspired by her work in Afghanistan from the moment I met her. She was the first woman to mountain bike in Afghanistan, so when she discovered that a woman’s cycling team was forming, I could tell she was excited to tell the story. She came to me with the idea of making a film about them, and I was on board immediately. The structure of the film has evolved and changed shapes in a lot of ways. After meeting the girls, we quickly realized how important this story was, and it wasn’t just about the cycling team. It’s also about the social and cultural taboos that these women are challenging by riding the bike.
3. why girls? why bikes?
Participating in sport gives individuals something to passionate about, and it allows them to be a part of cohesive team. For women in an oppressive county, that team dynamic and passion for sport can be incredibly empowering. Our story is about how the bicycle achieves this, and we see the metaphor of “pedaling a revolution” applying directly with this team of women who are challenging gender barriers. The bicycle played a big role in the Women’s Suffrage Movement in the States, and we see a lot of parallels between that time in our history, and the women on the cycling team in Afghanistan. There are more girls joining sports teams in Afghanistan everyday - boxing, basketball, volleyball, even skateboarding. The bike has long since been a symbol of freedom for women, most notably during the women’s suffrage movement in the United States in the early 1900’s.  The activist Susan B Anthony famously quoted that nothing was more important for women than bikes in the fight for equality.   Around the world today, the bike is a vehicle for social justice and change… used to help combat gender violence in rural communities, increase access to education and healthcare, and to provide cheap transportation alternatives.  In Afghanistan, riding bikes for women is still seen as culturally offensive and revolutionary.  Women have never rode bikes in Afghanistan and finally seeing young women ride bikes in the post-Taliban era is thrilling and inspiring, and sign of change to come.  
4. why Afghanistan? what was your initial motivation to go there? 
Shannon first traveled to Afghanistan in 2008, to start her work with women’s rights and gender equity in what is repeatedly ranked, the worst country in the world to be a woman. She wanted to find unique ways to work on behalf of women and girls, and over the past 15 visits, she had been inspired by the resiliency and strength of the women and girls that prove their worth every day in a culture that places little value on the lives of women. The concept of using the bicycle as a metaphor to “pedal a revolution” is a universal theme. Our ultimate goal with the film is to get more women on bikes, but we’re focusing on the Afghan team because they live in one of the hardest places in the world to be a woman. Documenting the progress and success of this team will show women internationally that riding bikes can be possible for women everywhere.
5. How’s the feedback with the locals? In your time in Afghanistan, did you ever face a lot of opposition from the people of Kabul?  
Our time in Kabul was amazing. Everyone we met was so hospitable and interested in what we were doing. There were certainly the times where your heart starts beating a little bit faster though - we were an all female crew filming an all female cycling team. Knowing that the team has been threatened in the past, we felt a bit vulnerable a handful of times. But our experience was incredibly hospitable. People always wanted to know more about what we were doing. We had incredible access with support from the local police chief and Province Governors. 
(Shannon’s Perspective) My interactions with Afghans has been 99% positive.  Its a difficult place for women to work, its an even more difficult place for women to live.  Women have found their voice and are integrated into every aspect of Afghan society in urban areas like Kabul.  Educated Afghan men and boys value the role of women in society and are moving towards a more equal society, but the majority of Afghanistan is rural and uneducated and that creates a country with a wide spectrum of values and expectations.  The fact remains that this is still one of the most oppressive countries to be a woman, the Taliban are in control of many parts of the country, and women have to fight for their rights every step of the way.   The women that ride their bikes are taking risks that we would never expect to face in the West just to pedal a bicycle.  But they do this to express their rights, the normalcy of riding of a bike, and to challenge the gender norms.  That doesn’t happen without ruffling a few feathers. 
6. Any story  that touched you particularly? 
It’s difficult to say that one story touched me anymore than another story. With each of the girls, there was always that moment where we could feel them trust us wholeheartedly. It came in different forms for each of them, but when that shift happened through smiles, hand gestures, and broken English, it was always so special to me. In the beginning, we were total strangers, so asking them to open up to us about such taboo topics was a lot for them. When those walls fell and we connected on what felt like a deep and respectful level - well as a documentary filmmaker, that’s always a really special moment.
"Photo by - Claudia Lopez Photography"
"Film shots from the documental"
www.afghancycles.com
girlsonwheelsmag:

Afghan Cycles by Ana V. Francés
"The bicycle has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world. It gives a woman a feeling of freedom and self-reliance. The moment she takes her seat she knows she can’t get into harm unless she gets off her bicycle, and away she goes, the picture of free, untrammeled womanhood." - Susan B. Anthony

1. Tell us about the project:
Afghan Cycles is a documentary film about the Women’s National Cycling Team of Afghanistan. We follow the girls from their daily lives to training, telling the story of what it means to be a female cyclist in an otherwise oppressive country.
2. where do the idea of the documentary come from? 
Our Producer and non profit partner, Shannon Galpin/Mountain2Mountain, approached me last winter to tell me about the women’s team that was taking shape in Afghanistan. I have known Shannon for years now, and have been inspired by her work in Afghanistan from the moment I met her. She was the first woman to mountain bike in Afghanistan, so when she discovered that a woman’s cycling team was forming, I could tell she was excited to tell the story. She came to me with the idea of making a film about them, and I was on board immediately. The structure of the film has evolved and changed shapes in a lot of ways. After meeting the girls, we quickly realized how important this story was, and it wasn’t just about the cycling team. It’s also about the social and cultural taboos that these women are challenging by riding the bike.
3. why girls? why bikes?
Participating in sport gives individuals something to passionate about, and it allows them to be a part of cohesive team. For women in an oppressive county, that team dynamic and passion for sport can be incredibly empowering. Our story is about how the bicycle achieves this, and we see the metaphor of “pedaling a revolution” applying directly with this team of women who are challenging gender barriers. The bicycle played a big role in the Women’s Suffrage Movement in the States, and we see a lot of parallels between that time in our history, and the women on the cycling team in Afghanistan. There are more girls joining sports teams in Afghanistan everyday - boxing, basketball, volleyball, even skateboarding. The bike has long since been a symbol of freedom for women, most notably during the women’s suffrage movement in the United States in the early 1900’s.  The activist Susan B Anthony famously quoted that nothing was more important for women than bikes in the fight for equality.   Around the world today, the bike is a vehicle for social justice and change… used to help combat gender violence in rural communities, increase access to education and healthcare, and to provide cheap transportation alternatives.  In Afghanistan, riding bikes for women is still seen as culturally offensive and revolutionary.  Women have never rode bikes in Afghanistan and finally seeing young women ride bikes in the post-Taliban era is thrilling and inspiring, and sign of change to come.  
4. why Afghanistan? what was your initial motivation to go there? 
Shannon first traveled to Afghanistan in 2008, to start her work with women’s rights and gender equity in what is repeatedly ranked, the worst country in the world to be a woman. She wanted to find unique ways to work on behalf of women and girls, and over the past 15 visits, she had been inspired by the resiliency and strength of the women and girls that prove their worth every day in a culture that places little value on the lives of women. The concept of using the bicycle as a metaphor to “pedal a revolution” is a universal theme. Our ultimate goal with the film is to get more women on bikes, but we’re focusing on the Afghan team because they live in one of the hardest places in the world to be a woman. Documenting the progress and success of this team will show women internationally that riding bikes can be possible for women everywhere.
5. How’s the feedback with the locals? In your time in Afghanistan, did you ever face a lot of opposition from the people of Kabul?  
Our time in Kabul was amazing. Everyone we met was so hospitable and interested in what we were doing. There were certainly the times where your heart starts beating a little bit faster though - we were an all female crew filming an all female cycling team. Knowing that the team has been threatened in the past, we felt a bit vulnerable a handful of times. But our experience was incredibly hospitable. People always wanted to know more about what we were doing. We had incredible access with support from the local police chief and Province Governors. 
(Shannon’s Perspective) My interactions with Afghans has been 99% positive.  Its a difficult place for women to work, its an even more difficult place for women to live.  Women have found their voice and are integrated into every aspect of Afghan society in urban areas like Kabul.  Educated Afghan men and boys value the role of women in society and are moving towards a more equal society, but the majority of Afghanistan is rural and uneducated and that creates a country with a wide spectrum of values and expectations.  The fact remains that this is still one of the most oppressive countries to be a woman, the Taliban are in control of many parts of the country, and women have to fight for their rights every step of the way.   The women that ride their bikes are taking risks that we would never expect to face in the West just to pedal a bicycle.  But they do this to express their rights, the normalcy of riding of a bike, and to challenge the gender norms.  That doesn’t happen without ruffling a few feathers. 
6. Any story  that touched you particularly? 
It’s difficult to say that one story touched me anymore than another story. With each of the girls, there was always that moment where we could feel them trust us wholeheartedly. It came in different forms for each of them, but when that shift happened through smiles, hand gestures, and broken English, it was always so special to me. In the beginning, we were total strangers, so asking them to open up to us about such taboo topics was a lot for them. When those walls fell and we connected on what felt like a deep and respectful level - well as a documentary filmmaker, that’s always a really special moment.
"Photo by - Claudia Lopez Photography"
"Film shots from the documental"
www.afghancycles.com
girlsonwheelsmag:

Afghan Cycles by Ana V. Francés
"The bicycle has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world. It gives a woman a feeling of freedom and self-reliance. The moment she takes her seat she knows she can’t get into harm unless she gets off her bicycle, and away she goes, the picture of free, untrammeled womanhood." - Susan B. Anthony

1. Tell us about the project:
Afghan Cycles is a documentary film about the Women’s National Cycling Team of Afghanistan. We follow the girls from their daily lives to training, telling the story of what it means to be a female cyclist in an otherwise oppressive country.
2. where do the idea of the documentary come from? 
Our Producer and non profit partner, Shannon Galpin/Mountain2Mountain, approached me last winter to tell me about the women’s team that was taking shape in Afghanistan. I have known Shannon for years now, and have been inspired by her work in Afghanistan from the moment I met her. She was the first woman to mountain bike in Afghanistan, so when she discovered that a woman’s cycling team was forming, I could tell she was excited to tell the story. She came to me with the idea of making a film about them, and I was on board immediately. The structure of the film has evolved and changed shapes in a lot of ways. After meeting the girls, we quickly realized how important this story was, and it wasn’t just about the cycling team. It’s also about the social and cultural taboos that these women are challenging by riding the bike.
3. why girls? why bikes?
Participating in sport gives individuals something to passionate about, and it allows them to be a part of cohesive team. For women in an oppressive county, that team dynamic and passion for sport can be incredibly empowering. Our story is about how the bicycle achieves this, and we see the metaphor of “pedaling a revolution” applying directly with this team of women who are challenging gender barriers. The bicycle played a big role in the Women’s Suffrage Movement in the States, and we see a lot of parallels between that time in our history, and the women on the cycling team in Afghanistan. There are more girls joining sports teams in Afghanistan everyday - boxing, basketball, volleyball, even skateboarding. The bike has long since been a symbol of freedom for women, most notably during the women’s suffrage movement in the United States in the early 1900’s.  The activist Susan B Anthony famously quoted that nothing was more important for women than bikes in the fight for equality.   Around the world today, the bike is a vehicle for social justice and change… used to help combat gender violence in rural communities, increase access to education and healthcare, and to provide cheap transportation alternatives.  In Afghanistan, riding bikes for women is still seen as culturally offensive and revolutionary.  Women have never rode bikes in Afghanistan and finally seeing young women ride bikes in the post-Taliban era is thrilling and inspiring, and sign of change to come.  
4. why Afghanistan? what was your initial motivation to go there? 
Shannon first traveled to Afghanistan in 2008, to start her work with women’s rights and gender equity in what is repeatedly ranked, the worst country in the world to be a woman. She wanted to find unique ways to work on behalf of women and girls, and over the past 15 visits, she had been inspired by the resiliency and strength of the women and girls that prove their worth every day in a culture that places little value on the lives of women. The concept of using the bicycle as a metaphor to “pedal a revolution” is a universal theme. Our ultimate goal with the film is to get more women on bikes, but we’re focusing on the Afghan team because they live in one of the hardest places in the world to be a woman. Documenting the progress and success of this team will show women internationally that riding bikes can be possible for women everywhere.
5. How’s the feedback with the locals? In your time in Afghanistan, did you ever face a lot of opposition from the people of Kabul?  
Our time in Kabul was amazing. Everyone we met was so hospitable and interested in what we were doing. There were certainly the times where your heart starts beating a little bit faster though - we were an all female crew filming an all female cycling team. Knowing that the team has been threatened in the past, we felt a bit vulnerable a handful of times. But our experience was incredibly hospitable. People always wanted to know more about what we were doing. We had incredible access with support from the local police chief and Province Governors. 
(Shannon’s Perspective) My interactions with Afghans has been 99% positive.  Its a difficult place for women to work, its an even more difficult place for women to live.  Women have found their voice and are integrated into every aspect of Afghan society in urban areas like Kabul.  Educated Afghan men and boys value the role of women in society and are moving towards a more equal society, but the majority of Afghanistan is rural and uneducated and that creates a country with a wide spectrum of values and expectations.  The fact remains that this is still one of the most oppressive countries to be a woman, the Taliban are in control of many parts of the country, and women have to fight for their rights every step of the way.   The women that ride their bikes are taking risks that we would never expect to face in the West just to pedal a bicycle.  But they do this to express their rights, the normalcy of riding of a bike, and to challenge the gender norms.  That doesn’t happen without ruffling a few feathers. 
6. Any story  that touched you particularly? 
It’s difficult to say that one story touched me anymore than another story. With each of the girls, there was always that moment where we could feel them trust us wholeheartedly. It came in different forms for each of them, but when that shift happened through smiles, hand gestures, and broken English, it was always so special to me. In the beginning, we were total strangers, so asking them to open up to us about such taboo topics was a lot for them. When those walls fell and we connected on what felt like a deep and respectful level - well as a documentary filmmaker, that’s always a really special moment.
"Photo by - Claudia Lopez Photography"
"Film shots from the documental"
www.afghancycles.com
girlsonwheelsmag:

Afghan Cycles by Ana V. Francés
"The bicycle has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world. It gives a woman a feeling of freedom and self-reliance. The moment she takes her seat she knows she can’t get into harm unless she gets off her bicycle, and away she goes, the picture of free, untrammeled womanhood." - Susan B. Anthony

1. Tell us about the project:
Afghan Cycles is a documentary film about the Women’s National Cycling Team of Afghanistan. We follow the girls from their daily lives to training, telling the story of what it means to be a female cyclist in an otherwise oppressive country.
2. where do the idea of the documentary come from? 
Our Producer and non profit partner, Shannon Galpin/Mountain2Mountain, approached me last winter to tell me about the women’s team that was taking shape in Afghanistan. I have known Shannon for years now, and have been inspired by her work in Afghanistan from the moment I met her. She was the first woman to mountain bike in Afghanistan, so when she discovered that a woman’s cycling team was forming, I could tell she was excited to tell the story. She came to me with the idea of making a film about them, and I was on board immediately. The structure of the film has evolved and changed shapes in a lot of ways. After meeting the girls, we quickly realized how important this story was, and it wasn’t just about the cycling team. It’s also about the social and cultural taboos that these women are challenging by riding the bike.
3. why girls? why bikes?
Participating in sport gives individuals something to passionate about, and it allows them to be a part of cohesive team. For women in an oppressive county, that team dynamic and passion for sport can be incredibly empowering. Our story is about how the bicycle achieves this, and we see the metaphor of “pedaling a revolution” applying directly with this team of women who are challenging gender barriers. The bicycle played a big role in the Women’s Suffrage Movement in the States, and we see a lot of parallels between that time in our history, and the women on the cycling team in Afghanistan. There are more girls joining sports teams in Afghanistan everyday - boxing, basketball, volleyball, even skateboarding. The bike has long since been a symbol of freedom for women, most notably during the women’s suffrage movement in the United States in the early 1900’s.  The activist Susan B Anthony famously quoted that nothing was more important for women than bikes in the fight for equality.   Around the world today, the bike is a vehicle for social justice and change… used to help combat gender violence in rural communities, increase access to education and healthcare, and to provide cheap transportation alternatives.  In Afghanistan, riding bikes for women is still seen as culturally offensive and revolutionary.  Women have never rode bikes in Afghanistan and finally seeing young women ride bikes in the post-Taliban era is thrilling and inspiring, and sign of change to come.  
4. why Afghanistan? what was your initial motivation to go there? 
Shannon first traveled to Afghanistan in 2008, to start her work with women’s rights and gender equity in what is repeatedly ranked, the worst country in the world to be a woman. She wanted to find unique ways to work on behalf of women and girls, and over the past 15 visits, she had been inspired by the resiliency and strength of the women and girls that prove their worth every day in a culture that places little value on the lives of women. The concept of using the bicycle as a metaphor to “pedal a revolution” is a universal theme. Our ultimate goal with the film is to get more women on bikes, but we’re focusing on the Afghan team because they live in one of the hardest places in the world to be a woman. Documenting the progress and success of this team will show women internationally that riding bikes can be possible for women everywhere.
5. How’s the feedback with the locals? In your time in Afghanistan, did you ever face a lot of opposition from the people of Kabul?  
Our time in Kabul was amazing. Everyone we met was so hospitable and interested in what we were doing. There were certainly the times where your heart starts beating a little bit faster though - we were an all female crew filming an all female cycling team. Knowing that the team has been threatened in the past, we felt a bit vulnerable a handful of times. But our experience was incredibly hospitable. People always wanted to know more about what we were doing. We had incredible access with support from the local police chief and Province Governors. 
(Shannon’s Perspective) My interactions with Afghans has been 99% positive.  Its a difficult place for women to work, its an even more difficult place for women to live.  Women have found their voice and are integrated into every aspect of Afghan society in urban areas like Kabul.  Educated Afghan men and boys value the role of women in society and are moving towards a more equal society, but the majority of Afghanistan is rural and uneducated and that creates a country with a wide spectrum of values and expectations.  The fact remains that this is still one of the most oppressive countries to be a woman, the Taliban are in control of many parts of the country, and women have to fight for their rights every step of the way.   The women that ride their bikes are taking risks that we would never expect to face in the West just to pedal a bicycle.  But they do this to express their rights, the normalcy of riding of a bike, and to challenge the gender norms.  That doesn’t happen without ruffling a few feathers. 
6. Any story  that touched you particularly? 
It’s difficult to say that one story touched me anymore than another story. With each of the girls, there was always that moment where we could feel them trust us wholeheartedly. It came in different forms for each of them, but when that shift happened through smiles, hand gestures, and broken English, it was always so special to me. In the beginning, we were total strangers, so asking them to open up to us about such taboo topics was a lot for them. When those walls fell and we connected on what felt like a deep and respectful level - well as a documentary filmmaker, that’s always a really special moment.
"Photo by - Claudia Lopez Photography"
"Film shots from the documental"
www.afghancycles.com
girlsonwheelsmag:

Afghan Cycles by Ana V. Francés
"The bicycle has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world. It gives a woman a feeling of freedom and self-reliance. The moment she takes her seat she knows she can’t get into harm unless she gets off her bicycle, and away she goes, the picture of free, untrammeled womanhood." - Susan B. Anthony

1. Tell us about the project:
Afghan Cycles is a documentary film about the Women’s National Cycling Team of Afghanistan. We follow the girls from their daily lives to training, telling the story of what it means to be a female cyclist in an otherwise oppressive country.
2. where do the idea of the documentary come from? 
Our Producer and non profit partner, Shannon Galpin/Mountain2Mountain, approached me last winter to tell me about the women’s team that was taking shape in Afghanistan. I have known Shannon for years now, and have been inspired by her work in Afghanistan from the moment I met her. She was the first woman to mountain bike in Afghanistan, so when she discovered that a woman’s cycling team was forming, I could tell she was excited to tell the story. She came to me with the idea of making a film about them, and I was on board immediately. The structure of the film has evolved and changed shapes in a lot of ways. After meeting the girls, we quickly realized how important this story was, and it wasn’t just about the cycling team. It’s also about the social and cultural taboos that these women are challenging by riding the bike.
3. why girls? why bikes?
Participating in sport gives individuals something to passionate about, and it allows them to be a part of cohesive team. For women in an oppressive county, that team dynamic and passion for sport can be incredibly empowering. Our story is about how the bicycle achieves this, and we see the metaphor of “pedaling a revolution” applying directly with this team of women who are challenging gender barriers. The bicycle played a big role in the Women’s Suffrage Movement in the States, and we see a lot of parallels between that time in our history, and the women on the cycling team in Afghanistan. There are more girls joining sports teams in Afghanistan everyday - boxing, basketball, volleyball, even skateboarding. The bike has long since been a symbol of freedom for women, most notably during the women’s suffrage movement in the United States in the early 1900’s.  The activist Susan B Anthony famously quoted that nothing was more important for women than bikes in the fight for equality.   Around the world today, the bike is a vehicle for social justice and change… used to help combat gender violence in rural communities, increase access to education and healthcare, and to provide cheap transportation alternatives.  In Afghanistan, riding bikes for women is still seen as culturally offensive and revolutionary.  Women have never rode bikes in Afghanistan and finally seeing young women ride bikes in the post-Taliban era is thrilling and inspiring, and sign of change to come.  
4. why Afghanistan? what was your initial motivation to go there? 
Shannon first traveled to Afghanistan in 2008, to start her work with women’s rights and gender equity in what is repeatedly ranked, the worst country in the world to be a woman. She wanted to find unique ways to work on behalf of women and girls, and over the past 15 visits, she had been inspired by the resiliency and strength of the women and girls that prove their worth every day in a culture that places little value on the lives of women. The concept of using the bicycle as a metaphor to “pedal a revolution” is a universal theme. Our ultimate goal with the film is to get more women on bikes, but we’re focusing on the Afghan team because they live in one of the hardest places in the world to be a woman. Documenting the progress and success of this team will show women internationally that riding bikes can be possible for women everywhere.
5. How’s the feedback with the locals? In your time in Afghanistan, did you ever face a lot of opposition from the people of Kabul?  
Our time in Kabul was amazing. Everyone we met was so hospitable and interested in what we were doing. There were certainly the times where your heart starts beating a little bit faster though - we were an all female crew filming an all female cycling team. Knowing that the team has been threatened in the past, we felt a bit vulnerable a handful of times. But our experience was incredibly hospitable. People always wanted to know more about what we were doing. We had incredible access with support from the local police chief and Province Governors. 
(Shannon’s Perspective) My interactions with Afghans has been 99% positive.  Its a difficult place for women to work, its an even more difficult place for women to live.  Women have found their voice and are integrated into every aspect of Afghan society in urban areas like Kabul.  Educated Afghan men and boys value the role of women in society and are moving towards a more equal society, but the majority of Afghanistan is rural and uneducated and that creates a country with a wide spectrum of values and expectations.  The fact remains that this is still one of the most oppressive countries to be a woman, the Taliban are in control of many parts of the country, and women have to fight for their rights every step of the way.   The women that ride their bikes are taking risks that we would never expect to face in the West just to pedal a bicycle.  But they do this to express their rights, the normalcy of riding of a bike, and to challenge the gender norms.  That doesn’t happen without ruffling a few feathers. 
6. Any story  that touched you particularly? 
It’s difficult to say that one story touched me anymore than another story. With each of the girls, there was always that moment where we could feel them trust us wholeheartedly. It came in different forms for each of them, but when that shift happened through smiles, hand gestures, and broken English, it was always so special to me. In the beginning, we were total strangers, so asking them to open up to us about such taboo topics was a lot for them. When those walls fell and we connected on what felt like a deep and respectful level - well as a documentary filmmaker, that’s always a really special moment.
"Photo by - Claudia Lopez Photography"
"Film shots from the documental"
www.afghancycles.com
girlsonwheelsmag:

Afghan Cycles by Ana V. Francés
"The bicycle has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world. It gives a woman a feeling of freedom and self-reliance. The moment she takes her seat she knows she can’t get into harm unless she gets off her bicycle, and away she goes, the picture of free, untrammeled womanhood." - Susan B. Anthony

1. Tell us about the project:
Afghan Cycles is a documentary film about the Women’s National Cycling Team of Afghanistan. We follow the girls from their daily lives to training, telling the story of what it means to be a female cyclist in an otherwise oppressive country.
2. where do the idea of the documentary come from? 
Our Producer and non profit partner, Shannon Galpin/Mountain2Mountain, approached me last winter to tell me about the women’s team that was taking shape in Afghanistan. I have known Shannon for years now, and have been inspired by her work in Afghanistan from the moment I met her. She was the first woman to mountain bike in Afghanistan, so when she discovered that a woman’s cycling team was forming, I could tell she was excited to tell the story. She came to me with the idea of making a film about them, and I was on board immediately. The structure of the film has evolved and changed shapes in a lot of ways. After meeting the girls, we quickly realized how important this story was, and it wasn’t just about the cycling team. It’s also about the social and cultural taboos that these women are challenging by riding the bike.
3. why girls? why bikes?
Participating in sport gives individuals something to passionate about, and it allows them to be a part of cohesive team. For women in an oppressive county, that team dynamic and passion for sport can be incredibly empowering. Our story is about how the bicycle achieves this, and we see the metaphor of “pedaling a revolution” applying directly with this team of women who are challenging gender barriers. The bicycle played a big role in the Women’s Suffrage Movement in the States, and we see a lot of parallels between that time in our history, and the women on the cycling team in Afghanistan. There are more girls joining sports teams in Afghanistan everyday - boxing, basketball, volleyball, even skateboarding. The bike has long since been a symbol of freedom for women, most notably during the women’s suffrage movement in the United States in the early 1900’s.  The activist Susan B Anthony famously quoted that nothing was more important for women than bikes in the fight for equality.   Around the world today, the bike is a vehicle for social justice and change… used to help combat gender violence in rural communities, increase access to education and healthcare, and to provide cheap transportation alternatives.  In Afghanistan, riding bikes for women is still seen as culturally offensive and revolutionary.  Women have never rode bikes in Afghanistan and finally seeing young women ride bikes in the post-Taliban era is thrilling and inspiring, and sign of change to come.  
4. why Afghanistan? what was your initial motivation to go there? 
Shannon first traveled to Afghanistan in 2008, to start her work with women’s rights and gender equity in what is repeatedly ranked, the worst country in the world to be a woman. She wanted to find unique ways to work on behalf of women and girls, and over the past 15 visits, she had been inspired by the resiliency and strength of the women and girls that prove their worth every day in a culture that places little value on the lives of women. The concept of using the bicycle as a metaphor to “pedal a revolution” is a universal theme. Our ultimate goal with the film is to get more women on bikes, but we’re focusing on the Afghan team because they live in one of the hardest places in the world to be a woman. Documenting the progress and success of this team will show women internationally that riding bikes can be possible for women everywhere.
5. How’s the feedback with the locals? In your time in Afghanistan, did you ever face a lot of opposition from the people of Kabul?  
Our time in Kabul was amazing. Everyone we met was so hospitable and interested in what we were doing. There were certainly the times where your heart starts beating a little bit faster though - we were an all female crew filming an all female cycling team. Knowing that the team has been threatened in the past, we felt a bit vulnerable a handful of times. But our experience was incredibly hospitable. People always wanted to know more about what we were doing. We had incredible access with support from the local police chief and Province Governors. 
(Shannon’s Perspective) My interactions with Afghans has been 99% positive.  Its a difficult place for women to work, its an even more difficult place for women to live.  Women have found their voice and are integrated into every aspect of Afghan society in urban areas like Kabul.  Educated Afghan men and boys value the role of women in society and are moving towards a more equal society, but the majority of Afghanistan is rural and uneducated and that creates a country with a wide spectrum of values and expectations.  The fact remains that this is still one of the most oppressive countries to be a woman, the Taliban are in control of many parts of the country, and women have to fight for their rights every step of the way.   The women that ride their bikes are taking risks that we would never expect to face in the West just to pedal a bicycle.  But they do this to express their rights, the normalcy of riding of a bike, and to challenge the gender norms.  That doesn’t happen without ruffling a few feathers. 
6. Any story  that touched you particularly? 
It’s difficult to say that one story touched me anymore than another story. With each of the girls, there was always that moment where we could feel them trust us wholeheartedly. It came in different forms for each of them, but when that shift happened through smiles, hand gestures, and broken English, it was always so special to me. In the beginning, we were total strangers, so asking them to open up to us about such taboo topics was a lot for them. When those walls fell and we connected on what felt like a deep and respectful level - well as a documentary filmmaker, that’s always a really special moment.
"Photo by - Claudia Lopez Photography"
"Film shots from the documental"
www.afghancycles.com
girlsonwheelsmag:

Afghan Cycles by Ana V. Francés
"The bicycle has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world. It gives a woman a feeling of freedom and self-reliance. The moment she takes her seat she knows she can’t get into harm unless she gets off her bicycle, and away she goes, the picture of free, untrammeled womanhood." - Susan B. Anthony

1. Tell us about the project:
Afghan Cycles is a documentary film about the Women’s National Cycling Team of Afghanistan. We follow the girls from their daily lives to training, telling the story of what it means to be a female cyclist in an otherwise oppressive country.
2. where do the idea of the documentary come from? 
Our Producer and non profit partner, Shannon Galpin/Mountain2Mountain, approached me last winter to tell me about the women’s team that was taking shape in Afghanistan. I have known Shannon for years now, and have been inspired by her work in Afghanistan from the moment I met her. She was the first woman to mountain bike in Afghanistan, so when she discovered that a woman’s cycling team was forming, I could tell she was excited to tell the story. She came to me with the idea of making a film about them, and I was on board immediately. The structure of the film has evolved and changed shapes in a lot of ways. After meeting the girls, we quickly realized how important this story was, and it wasn’t just about the cycling team. It’s also about the social and cultural taboos that these women are challenging by riding the bike.
3. why girls? why bikes?
Participating in sport gives individuals something to passionate about, and it allows them to be a part of cohesive team. For women in an oppressive county, that team dynamic and passion for sport can be incredibly empowering. Our story is about how the bicycle achieves this, and we see the metaphor of “pedaling a revolution” applying directly with this team of women who are challenging gender barriers. The bicycle played a big role in the Women’s Suffrage Movement in the States, and we see a lot of parallels between that time in our history, and the women on the cycling team in Afghanistan. There are more girls joining sports teams in Afghanistan everyday - boxing, basketball, volleyball, even skateboarding. The bike has long since been a symbol of freedom for women, most notably during the women’s suffrage movement in the United States in the early 1900’s.  The activist Susan B Anthony famously quoted that nothing was more important for women than bikes in the fight for equality.   Around the world today, the bike is a vehicle for social justice and change… used to help combat gender violence in rural communities, increase access to education and healthcare, and to provide cheap transportation alternatives.  In Afghanistan, riding bikes for women is still seen as culturally offensive and revolutionary.  Women have never rode bikes in Afghanistan and finally seeing young women ride bikes in the post-Taliban era is thrilling and inspiring, and sign of change to come.  
4. why Afghanistan? what was your initial motivation to go there? 
Shannon first traveled to Afghanistan in 2008, to start her work with women’s rights and gender equity in what is repeatedly ranked, the worst country in the world to be a woman. She wanted to find unique ways to work on behalf of women and girls, and over the past 15 visits, she had been inspired by the resiliency and strength of the women and girls that prove their worth every day in a culture that places little value on the lives of women. The concept of using the bicycle as a metaphor to “pedal a revolution” is a universal theme. Our ultimate goal with the film is to get more women on bikes, but we’re focusing on the Afghan team because they live in one of the hardest places in the world to be a woman. Documenting the progress and success of this team will show women internationally that riding bikes can be possible for women everywhere.
5. How’s the feedback with the locals? In your time in Afghanistan, did you ever face a lot of opposition from the people of Kabul?  
Our time in Kabul was amazing. Everyone we met was so hospitable and interested in what we were doing. There were certainly the times where your heart starts beating a little bit faster though - we were an all female crew filming an all female cycling team. Knowing that the team has been threatened in the past, we felt a bit vulnerable a handful of times. But our experience was incredibly hospitable. People always wanted to know more about what we were doing. We had incredible access with support from the local police chief and Province Governors. 
(Shannon’s Perspective) My interactions with Afghans has been 99% positive.  Its a difficult place for women to work, its an even more difficult place for women to live.  Women have found their voice and are integrated into every aspect of Afghan society in urban areas like Kabul.  Educated Afghan men and boys value the role of women in society and are moving towards a more equal society, but the majority of Afghanistan is rural and uneducated and that creates a country with a wide spectrum of values and expectations.  The fact remains that this is still one of the most oppressive countries to be a woman, the Taliban are in control of many parts of the country, and women have to fight for their rights every step of the way.   The women that ride their bikes are taking risks that we would never expect to face in the West just to pedal a bicycle.  But they do this to express their rights, the normalcy of riding of a bike, and to challenge the gender norms.  That doesn’t happen without ruffling a few feathers. 
6. Any story  that touched you particularly? 
It’s difficult to say that one story touched me anymore than another story. With each of the girls, there was always that moment where we could feel them trust us wholeheartedly. It came in different forms for each of them, but when that shift happened through smiles, hand gestures, and broken English, it was always so special to me. In the beginning, we were total strangers, so asking them to open up to us about such taboo topics was a lot for them. When those walls fell and we connected on what felt like a deep and respectful level - well as a documentary filmmaker, that’s always a really special moment.
"Photo by - Claudia Lopez Photography"
"Film shots from the documental"
www.afghancycles.com
girlsonwheelsmag:

Afghan Cycles by Ana V. Francés
"The bicycle has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world. It gives a woman a feeling of freedom and self-reliance. The moment she takes her seat she knows she can’t get into harm unless she gets off her bicycle, and away she goes, the picture of free, untrammeled womanhood." - Susan B. Anthony

1. Tell us about the project:
Afghan Cycles is a documentary film about the Women’s National Cycling Team of Afghanistan. We follow the girls from their daily lives to training, telling the story of what it means to be a female cyclist in an otherwise oppressive country.
2. where do the idea of the documentary come from? 
Our Producer and non profit partner, Shannon Galpin/Mountain2Mountain, approached me last winter to tell me about the women’s team that was taking shape in Afghanistan. I have known Shannon for years now, and have been inspired by her work in Afghanistan from the moment I met her. She was the first woman to mountain bike in Afghanistan, so when she discovered that a woman’s cycling team was forming, I could tell she was excited to tell the story. She came to me with the idea of making a film about them, and I was on board immediately. The structure of the film has evolved and changed shapes in a lot of ways. After meeting the girls, we quickly realized how important this story was, and it wasn’t just about the cycling team. It’s also about the social and cultural taboos that these women are challenging by riding the bike.
3. why girls? why bikes?
Participating in sport gives individuals something to passionate about, and it allows them to be a part of cohesive team. For women in an oppressive county, that team dynamic and passion for sport can be incredibly empowering. Our story is about how the bicycle achieves this, and we see the metaphor of “pedaling a revolution” applying directly with this team of women who are challenging gender barriers. The bicycle played a big role in the Women’s Suffrage Movement in the States, and we see a lot of parallels between that time in our history, and the women on the cycling team in Afghanistan. There are more girls joining sports teams in Afghanistan everyday - boxing, basketball, volleyball, even skateboarding. The bike has long since been a symbol of freedom for women, most notably during the women’s suffrage movement in the United States in the early 1900’s.  The activist Susan B Anthony famously quoted that nothing was more important for women than bikes in the fight for equality.   Around the world today, the bike is a vehicle for social justice and change… used to help combat gender violence in rural communities, increase access to education and healthcare, and to provide cheap transportation alternatives.  In Afghanistan, riding bikes for women is still seen as culturally offensive and revolutionary.  Women have never rode bikes in Afghanistan and finally seeing young women ride bikes in the post-Taliban era is thrilling and inspiring, and sign of change to come.  
4. why Afghanistan? what was your initial motivation to go there? 
Shannon first traveled to Afghanistan in 2008, to start her work with women’s rights and gender equity in what is repeatedly ranked, the worst country in the world to be a woman. She wanted to find unique ways to work on behalf of women and girls, and over the past 15 visits, she had been inspired by the resiliency and strength of the women and girls that prove their worth every day in a culture that places little value on the lives of women. The concept of using the bicycle as a metaphor to “pedal a revolution” is a universal theme. Our ultimate goal with the film is to get more women on bikes, but we’re focusing on the Afghan team because they live in one of the hardest places in the world to be a woman. Documenting the progress and success of this team will show women internationally that riding bikes can be possible for women everywhere.
5. How’s the feedback with the locals? In your time in Afghanistan, did you ever face a lot of opposition from the people of Kabul?  
Our time in Kabul was amazing. Everyone we met was so hospitable and interested in what we were doing. There were certainly the times where your heart starts beating a little bit faster though - we were an all female crew filming an all female cycling team. Knowing that the team has been threatened in the past, we felt a bit vulnerable a handful of times. But our experience was incredibly hospitable. People always wanted to know more about what we were doing. We had incredible access with support from the local police chief and Province Governors. 
(Shannon’s Perspective) My interactions with Afghans has been 99% positive.  Its a difficult place for women to work, its an even more difficult place for women to live.  Women have found their voice and are integrated into every aspect of Afghan society in urban areas like Kabul.  Educated Afghan men and boys value the role of women in society and are moving towards a more equal society, but the majority of Afghanistan is rural and uneducated and that creates a country with a wide spectrum of values and expectations.  The fact remains that this is still one of the most oppressive countries to be a woman, the Taliban are in control of many parts of the country, and women have to fight for their rights every step of the way.   The women that ride their bikes are taking risks that we would never expect to face in the West just to pedal a bicycle.  But they do this to express their rights, the normalcy of riding of a bike, and to challenge the gender norms.  That doesn’t happen without ruffling a few feathers. 
6. Any story  that touched you particularly? 
It’s difficult to say that one story touched me anymore than another story. With each of the girls, there was always that moment where we could feel them trust us wholeheartedly. It came in different forms for each of them, but when that shift happened through smiles, hand gestures, and broken English, it was always so special to me. In the beginning, we were total strangers, so asking them to open up to us about such taboo topics was a lot for them. When those walls fell and we connected on what felt like a deep and respectful level - well as a documentary filmmaker, that’s always a really special moment.
"Photo by - Claudia Lopez Photography"
"Film shots from the documental"
www.afghancycles.com
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girlsonwheelsmag:

Thonet Bike
London designer Andy Martin has designed a wooden road bicycle for Thonet.

http://www.andymartinstudio.com/edition-commission/Thonet-bike/
girlsonwheelsmag:

Thonet Bike
London designer Andy Martin has designed a wooden road bicycle for Thonet.

http://www.andymartinstudio.com/edition-commission/Thonet-bike/
girlsonwheelsmag:

Thonet Bike
London designer Andy Martin has designed a wooden road bicycle for Thonet.

http://www.andymartinstudio.com/edition-commission/Thonet-bike/